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Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Klass - Map Marye (Haitian Kompas video with lyrics + English translation)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases a video of the 2016 Haitian Kompas song "Map Marye" by Klass.

Information about this music group is included in this post along with lyrics for this song in Haitian Creole and their English translation.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.
All copyrights remain with their owner.

Thanks to Klass for this song and thanks to all those who quoted in this post. Thanks also to the publisher of this video on YouTube.

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO: KLASS - Map Marye official music video!



kompagrooves, Published on Aug 5, 2016
-snip-
Here's a comment in English from that video's discussion thread:
Oasisfullfilled, 2016
"One thing I can say about Klass they be talking about real subjects that people go through. This is the perfect song to send to your peeps when they triping. Haitians forget what they went through and put that pressure on their kids, they mean well but sometimes they can be overbearing : ) But I love my Haitian Parents and people. Klass it is baby!!!"

****
LYRICS: MAP MARYE

Papi pa di m ou bliye
Mati ou di m ou te pase
Lè ou ak manmanm te fèk rankontre
Se paske w te kenbe jodya m ekziste

[Pre-chorus]
Pouki ou vle pou pitit ou eritye
Mizè ou te andire, se pa sa l ta dwe ye
Se li mwen vle, benediksyon ou konte
Men si w pa aksepte, m ap oblije marye

[Chorus]
M ap marye, oh m ap marye avè l
Li respekte fanmi l, nan li mwen wè lavi m
M ap marye, oh m ap marye avè l
M pa mande pèmisyon, m ap chèche benediksyon

[Verse 2]
Manmi ou di m ou pa vle wè l
Ou di m san w pa ale avè l
Sonje se mwen ki pral viv avèl
Li fè lavi m pi bèl ohh

[Pre-chorus]
Pouki ou vle pou pitit ou eritye
Mizè ou te andire, se pa sa l ta dwe ye
Se li mwen vle, benediksyon ou konte
Men si w pa aksepte, m ap oblije marye

[Chorus]
M ap marye, oh m ap marye avè l
Li respekte fanmi l, nan li mwen wè lavi m
M ap marye, oh m ap marye avè l
M pa mande pèmisyon, m ap chèche benediksyon

[Guitar solo]
Woy, woy konpa
Pipo tout jan tout tan
Woy, woy
Wouch, oh letènèl
Lalalalalala
Eske nelson patisserie plòtonnen

Mamni tande – ya oh
Sa se pitit ou kap pale – ya ya oh
Mwen toujou fè sa w vle men fwa sa ou dwe sipòte m – ya ya oh
Papi tanpri – ya oh
M konnen w pa ta vle m soufri – ya ya oh
Men ou pa ka fè santiman m, se li menm ki tout kè kontan m

Manmi ou se tèt chapo mwen ba ou, fò w mete l
Nou pa ka chwazi pou mwen, je suis plus un garmin
Papi ou se tèt chapo mwen ba ou, fò w mete l
Nou toulède gradye profesyonèl nou ye

Cheri pa enkyete w, m gen kontwòl tout bagay
K L A S S, klass
Konpa, konpa
Sa son w brezo
Woy woy, yo mele
Yaya fly
Woy woy, yo mele
Klass it is baby, yes it is baby
Moskino
Bon nou pral bay on ti apèsu sou bal la wi, tande sa

Gen sa k gen tèt ki pa gen kò
Gen sa k gen kò ki pa gen tèt
Nou menm djaz sa nou gen tèt nou gen kò, depose konpa

Se se se, ay, men konpa

Manmi ou se tèt chapo mwen ba ou, fò w mete l
Si nou konnen nou byen eduke m, pouki nou gen dout sou chwa m ap fè
Papi ou se tèt chapo mwen ba ou, fò w mete l

*** Source : wikimizik***
From https://www.konpaevents.com/new-song-lyrics-sing-with-klass-map-marye-lyrics/

****
-snip-
Google translation from Haitian Creole to English:

Papi does not tell me you forgot
Mathew told me you had passed
When you and your mother have just met
It's because you've kept me jody

[Pre-chorus]
Why do you want your children to inherit?
The affair you endured is not what it should be
I want it, your blessing is counted
But if you do not accept, I'll have to get married

[Chorus]
I'm getting married, oh marrying
She respects her family, in her I see my life
I'm getting married, oh marrying
I do not ask permission, I look for blessings

[Verse 2]
Your mommy tells me you do not want to see her
You tell me without going with her
Remember that I am going to live
It makes my life more beautiful ohh

[Pre-chorus]
Why do you want your children to inherit?
The affair you endured is not what it should be
I want it, your blessing is counted
But if you do not accept, I'll have to get married

[Chorus]
I'm getting married, oh marrying
She respects her family, in her I see my life
I'm getting married, oh marrying
I do not ask permission, I look for blessings

[Guitar solo]
Woy, woy compass
Pipo all the way
Woy, woy
Wear, oh let's go
Lalalalalala
Is Nelson patisserie plungned

Mamni heard - ya oh
This is your baby - oh ya
I always do what you want but the time you have to support me - oh ya
Papi please - ya oh
I know you do not want me to suffer - ya oh
But you can not make my feelings, it's all my joy

Your mommy is the head of my hat, give it to you
You can not choose for me, I'm still garmin
Your pope is the head of my hat, give it to you
We are both professional graduates

Cheri does not worry, I have control of everything
K L A S S, class
Compass, compass
That sounds wild
Woy yawn, they are confused
Yaya fly
Woy yawn, they are confused
Class it is baby, yes it is baby
Moskino
Well, we'll give a little insight into the bullet, yes

There are those who do not have bodies
There is no body that has no head
We ourselves have our bodies, our compassions

It is, ay, but compass

Your mommy is the head of my hat, give it to you
If you know me well, why do you have doubts about my choices?
Your pope is the head of my hat, give it to you
-snip-
Additions and corrections for these lyrics are welcome.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT KLASS
From http://kompamagazine.com/kompaboard/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=422 KLASS AND THE HAITIAN MUSIC INDUSTRY aka (HMI)?
..."In the entertainment industry, especially music, groups are formed and disbanded afterward for different reasons and that’s how KLASS got into the game on April 18, 2012 with their members as follows:

• Maestro & drummer, Jean Herard Richard aka Richie aka Hitmaker/Superstar maker.
• Lead vocal: Edersse Stanis: aka Pipo, The prophet/The voice.
• Lead guitar: Romny Floristal aka El Pozo the Assassin.
• Bass guitar: Nixon Mesidor aka Sexy Nicky.
• Rhythm Guitar: Kevin Gaippe aka BelKod.
• Percussions: Wid Pierre aka Carlo Cheveux.
• Keyboard: Jean Pierre Francisque aka JP.
• Congas: Sorel Sanon aka Soso Brezo.
• Saxophone: Abdel LaFrance aka Taxman
• Trumpet: Nathan Seth Merlin
• Sound engineer: Lavaud Georges
• Logistic: Serge Enel Jean-Louis aka Sergo.
• Manager: Herve Bastien aka Manager the Best

Today, before KLASS became the envy of the HMI due to their sudden success, Jean Herard Richard the proud founder of the band along with Romny Floristal, Nixon Mesidor Herve Bastien then later on Edersse Stanis, went through stages in his musical career. Jean Herard Richard was born in Port-au-Prince, Haiti in October that makes him a Libra. He grew up in the North of Haiti, Cap Haitian where he attended school. He went from bands to bands like Power-X, 2nd Fashion then made his way to the United States in 1992 where he attended college at BCC in Miami, Florida. Then, he joined Tah-Pajj until 1996. Richie left that group to join Zenglen from 1997 to 2011. At that point, he realized that stability is essential in order to secure a viable future in this shaky industry for himself and his band mates. That’s how the magical group KLASS was born in the HMI on April 18, 2012.

At first, when KLASS released their first single “Bagay Neuf” in early 2012 with a different lead singer, the song was a very hot song but not good enough to create the buzz that the Hitmaker, the superstar maker is known for. So sensibly, Richie closed shop and went back to the studio for months with other Klassmates to create new hit songs like “Priorite, You don’t want me” etc. None of this would have been possible without the Prophet, Pipo, the commanding voice of Konpa Direk of today. Note that Pipo wasn’t part of the group initially. He later joined KLASS after his departure from another reputable group known to most in the HMI. The rest is history in the making since the release of their first CD in 2013. That album sets the bar so high that Klass becomes without any doubt the number one band in the industry and to this date they are still packing clubs wherever they are performing."...

****
From http://www.elinefleury.com/single-post/2016/1/25/Klass-Best-Haitian-Entertainer-of-the-Year
Klass " Best Haitian Entertainer of the Year"
January 25, 2016 by Kate Menard
"Since its inception, just under four years ago, Konpa band KLASS has seen quick and tremendous success. This past October, at the 34th Annual International Reggae & World Music Awards, KLASS took home "Best Haitian Entertainer of the Year". Despite its accolades and fame, however, it is apparent that the band remains grounded, dedicated to its music, and dedicated to its fans."

****
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Visitor comments are welcome.

Monday, January 15, 2018

Distinctive Names That Are Used By Some African Americans & By Some Mormons

Eited by Azizi Powell

Revised January 16, 2018

This pancocojams post presents some examples of distinctive Mormon names that are the same as or very similar to some contemporary (1960s to date) distinctive African American names.

A quote about a famous African American with that name is given after some of these selected names. I've also added other brief notes about some of these selected names.

This post is part of pancocojams' ongoing series on distinctive names and nicknames.

The content of this post is presented for etymological and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.

****
PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTE
This list of names consists of selected names from a website entitled "1,500,000 baby names MALE Mormon baby names" and its companion webpage "1,500,000 baby names FEMALE Mormon baby names" (hyperlinks given below).

For the purpose of this post, I've selected those Mormon names that I (as an African American and as a collector of contemporary African American names) have directly known, read of, or heard. These contemporary distinctive names that I've showcased below are either exactly the same as those that have been given to or are still given to African Americans, or they are reworkings (different spellings, and other variant forms) of these names. Rightly or wrongly, most of these names are often referred to as "Black names".

As to how Mormons may have become familiar with these names, firstly, some Mormons are Black and therefore may know these names. Secondly, my position is that Mormons who give their children distinctive names are alert to possible names from the mass media (particularly television, movies, and the internet) and/or from their direct interaction with African Americans and other people who aren't Mormons.

From my reading about Mormon naming practices, it appears to me that African Americans and Mormons use some of the same or similar strategies to create distinctive names. For example, some names are created by combining two already existing names, non-standard spelling is frequently used to create uniqueness, a prefix and/or suffix is (are) used to create unique names, some names include an apostrophe, and some names are hyphenated. Furthermore, some distinctive African American names and Mormon names use nouns as names (such as virtue words, time of birth words, names of seasons, and status nouns).

That said, these two populations appear to use different sets of "nouns as names" - which leads me to this larger point: Many Mormon names are different from African American names because the "pool of names" that is used (and available to be used) by Mormons is considerably different from African Americans' pool of names. For example, a number of contemporary (1960 on) distinctive names that some African Americans use are Arabic names or are variant forms of Arabic names. Also, from the 1960s on some African Americans have given our children names, clips, of names, or names re-purposed from nouns from certain traditional African languages (particularly Swahili, Akan, and Zulu). Three examples of names from these three traditional African languages are the Swahili word "nia" (pronounced KNEE-ah) used as a female name, the Akan male day name "Kwame" (pronounced KWAH-me"), the Yoruba name element/nickname "tunde" pronounced TOON-day) used as a male name, and the Zulu male name "Shaka" (pronounced SHAH-ka) and also given as "Chaka" among African Americans.

In contrast, according to http://www.momjunction.com/articles/mormon-baby-names-for-girls-and-boys_00424377/#gref 50 Latest Mormon Baby Names For Boys And Girls With Meanings
"Mormons, the members of the church residing in Utah, US, have a mantra, “in the world, but not of the world”, which they apply to everything, including the way they name their children. They pick standard names but tweak the spelling a bit to make it exclusive to them. However, not every Mormon parent likes invented or combination names for their children. Some choose Biblical names or names derived from the stories or chapters of the Book of Mormon, a religious text of the Latter Day Saints."...
-snip-
That same website author wrote about "the passion for ‘y’ in girl names among the Mormons" and gave some examples of female "y" names including "Jossilyn", "Madelyn", and "Payslee".

Another website on Mormon names https://nameberry.com/blog/mormon-baby-names-traditions-and-trends Mormon Baby Names: Traditions and trends (Posted January 11th, 2015) indicates that "Even among Utah baby names, though, there are trends. Boys’ names lean heavily towards two syllable names ending with –er, –en and –ton. While mainstream names like Jayden remain popular, it’s really better to pick something a little more unusual. Truxton perhaps? Decken, Nyler, Kyson, Teyton, Zyker, and Trusen have all been chosen for babies recently.

Girls’ names almost always have a letter y in them somewhere. Mormons love the letter y. Which explains the popularity of names that end with –ley (or more commonly –lee or –leigh), and names that end with –lyn: Kyzlee, Oaklyn, Tynslee, McCartlyn, Avonlie, Chandley, Skylynne. and Chasidee."...
-snip-
One of my conclusion from these excerpts is that Mormon "sound preferences" are different from African American sound preferences. I believe that a few examples of African American sound preferences are "sha/cha" prefixes and/or suffixes (as in the name "Shante"), the "aun"/"on" and "La" prefix as in the name "LaShaun" ("Lashon", "Lashawn"), and the "isha" suffix as in the name "Keisha"). Note: These names are mostly given to females, but, with the exception of "Keisha" might also be given to males. Also, these names all have numerous forms created by respellings, adding apostrophes, capitalizing the first letter of the second syllable, or adding a prefix or a suffix.

****
DISCLAIMER
This post isn't meant to imply that all Mormons give their children distinctive names.

I don't consider myself to be an expert on African American naming practices. However, I am African American and I have been informally studying African American naming practices and I have been collecting examples of distinctive African American names for more than twenty years.

In contrast, my only knowledge of Mormon names and Mormon naming practices is what I've read online.

This isn't meant to be a comprehensive list of African American and Mormon shared distinctive names.

There are other, largely no longer given "older names" in those Mormon lists that some African Americans had prior to the 1960s. However, I've not added names from that category onto this "shared names" list that is found below.

This list also doesn't include examples of what I consider to be "different", "trendy" names from these online sources that are now popular in the general American population including African Americans. "Brookelyn", a variant spelling of "Brooklyn" is an example of that category of different names.

I'm aware that other people might arrive at a different list of "shared" African American & Mormon names than the one that I've given below.

Additions and corrections to this shared list of names are welcome.

****
SELECTED DISTINCTIVE MORMON NAMES AND DISTINCTIVE AFRICAN AMERICAN NAMES [SHARED MALE NAMES]
Pancocojams Editor's Note: I've included comments about some of these names after the name itself.

EXCERPT #1:
List of Mormon names from http://www.just-think-it.com/sbn/mormon-m.htm "1,500,000 baby names MALE Mormon baby names"

A, B
C, D
Cordell
D'Monte
Daquan
-snip-
Among African Americans, this name is usually pronounced "DAY-quan".
-snip-
Darnell
Delmar
Deontre'
-snip-
Among African Americans, this name is spelled "Deondre" without the apostrophe at the end. It is also spelled "DeAndre" and "Deaundray" among other spellings.

Deron
-snip-
Among African Americans, this name has various other spellings, including capitalizing the "r". Often a suffix is added such as "Deronte (usually pronounced "day-RON-tay)
-snip-
DeShawn
-snip-
This contemporary male name is very popular among certain populations of African Americans. It is usually pronounced "Day-shawn". Instead of Deshawn, the prefix could be "Da" (pronounced "day") and, like other De/day names, its nickname is often "Day Day"). The "shawn" element is spelled "shon", "shaun", or "sean". This name could also have an added suffix (such as "te"/"tay" or "dre"/"dray".

One female form of this name among African Americans is "Deshawna".
-snip-
Devon
-snip-
Among African Americans, in the name "Devon" usually has a suffix (same as DeShawn), but I believe that the "De" in Devonte (for example) is usually pronounced "dah") and not "day". An African American spelling of this name is "DeVante". A famous example: "DeVante Swing" - member of the American R&B quartet with brothers DeVante Swing, Mr. Dalvin, K-Ci, and JoJo https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jodeci
-snip-
DeWayne
-snip-
This name is also spelled "Dwayne" among African Americans. A famous example of an African American with this name is Dwyane Tyrone Wade Jr., born January 17, 1982) is an American professional basketball player for the Cleveland Cavaliers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dwyane_Wade

E, F
G, H
I, J
Jacari
-snip-
Among African Americans, I believe that this male name is usually spelled "Jaquari" (pronunciation: jah-KAH-ree or jah-CAR-ree). An "African American" variant form of this male name is "Jaquarius".
Jaden
Jadon
K, L
Kenrick
LaMar
Larnell
-snip-
This name serves as an example of the frequent use of the "ell" suffix in Mormon male (and female) names and in African American male (and female) names.
-snip-
LaVar
LeVar
-snip-
Levardis Robert Martyn "LeVar" Burton Jr. (born February 16, 1957) is an American actor, presenter, director and author. He is best known for his roles as the host of the long-running PBS children's series Reading Rainbow, Lt. Commander Geordi La Forge in Star Trek: The Next Generation and the young Kunta Kinte in the 1977 award-winning ABC television miniseries Roots". https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/LeVar_Burton
-snip-

M, N
Mondell
Among African Americans, this name is usually given as "Montell".
"Montell Du'Sean Barnett (born December 3, 1968), known professionally as Montell Jordan, is an American singer, songwriter and record producer, best known for his 1995 single "This Is How We Do It"." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montell_Jordan
-snip-
Notice the middle name Du'Sean which is a rare example of a distinctive African American apostrophe name that includes the widely used "Sean" ("Shawn", "Shon", "Shaun") name.
-snip-
Montel Brian Anthony Williams (born July 3, 1956) is an American television personality, radio talk show host, and actor. He is best known as host of the long-running The Montel Williams Show"...https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Montel_Williams.

O, P
Odell
Q, R
S, T
Shay
-snip-
Among African American, this is usually a female nickname, often doubled ("Shay Shay")
Shon
-snip-
Among African Americans, "Shon" may be most often spelled "Shaun" or (when spelled various ways) is an element that is part of longer male or female names.
-snip-
Tevyn
-snip-
This name serves as an example of the Mormon custom of substituting a "y" for the letter "i" in names. Among African Americans, "Tevyn" is usually spelled "Tevin".
"Tevin Jermod Campbell (born November 12, 1976) is an American singer, songwriter and actor." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tevin_Campbell
-snip-
Tevin Ford Coleman (born April 16, 1993) is an American football running back for the Atlanta Falcons of the National Football League (NFL). https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tevin_Coleman
-snip-
Trace-Denzel
-snip-
I added the name "Trace-Denzel" to give an example of a Mormon hyphenated name.
-snip-
"Denzel Hayes Washington Jr. (born December 28, 1954)[1] is an American actor, director, and producer. He has received three Golden Globe awards, a Tony Award,[2] and two Academy Awards: Best Supporting Actor for the historical war drama film Glory (1989) and Best Actor for his role as a corrupt cop in the crime thriller Training Day (2001)" https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Denzel_Washington
-snip-
Travon
-snip-
"Trayvon" is another spelling of this name among African Americans. A famous example of this name is Trayvon Martin (February 5, 1995 – February 26, 2012), a 17-year-old African American from Miami Gardens, Florida, who was fatally shot in Sanford, Florida by George Zimmerman, a neighborhood watch volunteer. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trayvon_Martin
-snip-
U, V
W, X
Y, Z

****
SELECTED DISTINCTIVE MORMON NAMES AND DISTINCTIVE CONTEMPORARY AFRICAN AMERICAN NAMES [SHARED FEMALE NAMES]
Excerpt #2: From http://www.just-think-it.com/sbn/mormon-f.htm http://www.just-think-it.com/sbn/mormon-f.htm "1,500,000 baby names FEMALE Mormon baby names"

A, B
Alena
Aleta
Alina
Alinda
Almira
Anniyah
Ardell
Ardella
Arletta
Arminta
Askia
-snip-
"Askia" is a male African name for a famous historical figure https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Askia_Mohammad_I. I've no direct experience with it being used as a female or male name, but a Google search resulted in the male name Askia Booker (a Black male basketball player) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Askia_Booker
-snip-
Azi
-snip-
This is one of the nicknames that people have used for my (female) Kiswahili originated name "Azizi". I've been told that the Arabic form of this name "Aziza" is the most often used female form of the male name "Aziz".

C, D
Chandra
Chanice
-snip-
Among African Americans, the name "Chanice" may be spelled "Shanice", and is an example of the frequent us of "Sha" and "Cha" prefixes in African American names. Those prefixes are also found, but not as frequently, in Mormon names.
-snip-
Shanice Lorraine Wilson[1] (born May 14, 1973), better known simply as Shanice, is an American singer–songwriter, actress and dancer. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shanice
-snip-
The suffix "ice" (pronounced "ees") is found many more African American names than Mormon names. The African American names with the suffix "ice" are usually female, but one common example is the male name "Maurice".
-snip-
Channa
Channelle
Chantell
Charis
-snip-
Among African Americans, this name is given as "Karis".
-snip-
Cherysa
-snip-
The name "Cherise" that is relatively common among African Americans. This name is similar to the name "Cherysa" that is found in this Mormon name list. The substitution of a "y" for an "i" appears to be a commonly spelling practice among some Mormons according to several online articles including https://nameberry.com/blog/mormon-baby-names-traditions-and-trends "Mormon Baby Names: Traditions and trends" quote: "Girls’ names almost always have a letter y in them somewhere. Mormons love the letter y. Which explains the popularity of names that end with –ley (or more commonly –lee or –leigh), and names that end with –lyn"...
-snip-
Chiara
-snip-
"Ciara" is another spelling of this name. "Ciara Princess Harris (born October 25, 1985),[1] known mononymously as Ciara ... is an American singer, songwriter, record producer, dancer, model and actress. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ciara
-snip-

Chenille
Claudean
-snip-
"Claudine is a 1974 American comedy-drama, romantic film, produced by Third World Films and distributed by 20th Century Fox... it is noted for being one of the few mainstream films featuring an African-American cast released during that time which was not a blaxploitation film." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Claudine_(film)
-snip-
DaNeen
-snip-
Among African Americans, this name is also spelled "Deneen" and pronounced dah-NEEN.
-snip-
Danetta
Danica
-snip-
The "ica" suffix is often given as "ika" in contemporary "African American" names.
-snip-
Dannika
Dawnica
-snip-
Judging from the lists of Mormon names that I've read, "Dawn" is a popular name element among some Mormon, similar to the popularity of the name element "Shawn" (and its variant spellings "Shon", "Shaun" and "Sean" among some African Americans.
-snip-
Deja
-snip-
Deja was the name of the fictional character that Tyra Banks played in the 1995 movie Higher Learning. According to http://www.thinkbabynames.com/meaning/0/Deja : "Deja entered the list in 1980-1989 and reached its peak position of #182 in the U.S. in the year 1996, and is presently at #1947. (2016 BIRTH STATISTICS)"
-snip-
Deneen
-snip-
I know an African American woman name "Deneen" who was born in the 1970s.
Deneil
Denica
DeShaune
-snip-
This name is very similar to the multiple African American names (both male and female) which include the element "Shaun" or another spelling of that name. Female names with this element may end with "a" (i.e. DeShauna". The "de" prefix in those names is usually pronounced "day".
-snip-
Desta
-snip-
The name "Desta" is found on online list of Ethiopian female names, with the meaning "happiness". http://www.top-100-baby-names-search.com/ethiopian-baby-names.html. I know one African American woman with this name.
-snip-
Destany
-snip-
The female name "Destiny" is relatively common among African Americans.
-snip-
DeVonte
-snip-
Among African Americans, this name is usually given to males. (Read the name list for males that is found above.)
-snip-
Dorenda
Donetta
E, F
Felisa
-snip-
Among African Americans, this name is usually spelled "Felicia". This name has been popularized by the saying "Bye Felicia".

An uncommon African American spelling of this name is Phylicia Rashād ...(June 19, 1948) is an American actress, singer and stage director. She is known for her role as Clair Huxtable on the long-running NBC sitcom The Cosby Show (1984–92), which earned her Emmy Award nominations in 1985 and 1986." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phylicia_Rashad
-snip-
Florice
Heaven-Lee
Heavenly-Melanie
-snip-
The name "Heaven" and "Heavenly" are found among African Americans. I added these example of Mormon names to document the use of hyphenated names are among Mormons. I'm not aware if these names are hyphenated among African Americans.
-snip-
G, H
I, J
Imari
-snip-
The name "Imari" is similar in spelling and pronunciation to the name "Amari". African Americans have used the name Amari as male and female name. "Amari" is said to be of Swahili origin, but it could have been coined by African Americans from the male name "Amiri" (meaning "prince").

"Amari Cooper (born June 17, 1994) is an American football wide receiver for the Oakland Raiders of the National Football League. He played college football at the University of Alabama where he was the Biletnikoff Award winner as the nation's top receiver and a unanimous All-American in 2014. Widely considered the top wide receiver prospect of the 2015 NFL Draft, he was selected with the fourth overall pick by the Raiders." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amari_Cooper.
-snip-
Isha
"Isha" is a female name and also a very widely used contemporary (African American) suffix. "Aisha" (usually pronounced "I-EE-sha" (and sometimes spelled "Iesha") is the most frequently found "isha" name among African Americans.

Here's some information about the Arabic word "isha":
"The Isha prayer (Arabic: صلاة العشاء‎ ṣalāt al-ʿišāʾ... "night prayer") is the night-time daily prayer recited by practising Muslims. It is the fifth of the five daily prayers– (salat) [Islamic evening begins at maghrib]."... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isha_prayer
-snip-
Among African Americans, the name "Isha" may be considered a clip of the now relatively widely known Arabic name "Aisha" ("Ayisha", "Ayesha, "Iesha" etc.). "Iesha" is the title of a 1990 hit R&B record about a girl with that name. The song was recorded by the African American young boys group "Another Bad Creation (ABC)".
-snip-
Janielle
Among African Americans, this name is also spelled "Janelle" and may be best known because of the singer Janelle Monae.

"Janelle Monáe Robinson...born December 1, 1985)[10] is an American recording artist, record producer, actress and model"... K, Lhttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Janelle_Mon%C3%A1e
-snip-
Javan
-snip-
Among African Americans, the name "Javan" is usually given as "Javon". "Javon" is usually considered a male name.
-snip-
Jayla
"Jayla" is a frequently found contemporary name among African Americans.
Jelisa
Jelissa
Jenica
Jennica
Jinaya
-snip-
Among African Americans, the female name "Jinaya" is usually spelled "Jeniya". This contemporary name is widely found among African Americans.
-snip-
Jontay
-snip-
Among African Americans "Jontay" ("Jonte") is a male or female name. This name may have been coined by African Americans by rhyming the male name "Donte".
-snip-
K, L
Kieri
Kieron
Kiersha
Kirsha
Kishia
-snip-
The three names "Kiersha", "Kirsha", and "Kishia" are similar in spelling to the very frequently used contemporary African American name "Keisha" (found with multiple spellings). I believe that this name became so popular among African Americans as a result of this actress: "Keshia Knight Pulliam (born April 9, 1979)[2] is an American actress. She is known for her childhood role as Rudy Huxtable, the youngest child of Cliff and Clair Huxtable at just the age of 5 to 13, on the NBC sitcom The Cosby Show (1984–92)...https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Keshia_Knight_Pulliam.
-snip-
Lachelle
LaTisha
-snip-
In my experience, the name "LaTisha" is usually pronounced lah-TIS-sha (with "tis" rhyming with the English word "wish".)
Read the note about the name "Tisha" below.
-snip-
LaShawna
Lavonda
-snip-
There are other "La" names in this list of Mormon female names. While I recognize other names on this list as ones that African Americans have, those names that I recognize appear to me to predate the late 1960s (names such as LaRinda, Lorinda, (among African Americans "Larenda"), "LaRue", "LaQuita", Latrina, and "Lavada" (pronounced lah-VEY-dah), LaVonne (LaVaughn) are names of females who I've known who are in their fifties and sixties. A famous example of the name "LaVaughn" among African Americans is "Michelle LaVaughn Robinson Obama (born January 17, 1964) is an American lawyer and writer who was First Lady of the United States from 2009 to 2017. She is married to the 44th President of the United States, Barack Obama, and is the first African-American First Lady. Raised on the South Side of Chicago".https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michelle_Obama.
-snip-
M, N
M'Kayla
Macayla
McKayla
-snip-
The female name "Makayla" (pronounced mah-KAY-lah) is frequently found among African Americans.
-snip-
Malia
Malia (pronunciation mah-LEE-ah) is the oldest daughter of President Barack Obama and Michelle Obama. Her younger sister is named Natasha (Sasha). http://csipresident.wikia.com/wiki/Malia_Obama.
-snip-
Niecee
Among African American "Neecy" is a nickname for the name "Denise".
-snip-
O, P
Q, R
Rhiana
Among Americans and others, this name is most widely associated with the singer "Rihanna".
"Robyn Rihanna Fenty ... February 20, 1988) is a Barbadian singer, songwriter, and actress." https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rihanna
-snip-
S, T
Risha
-snip-
This is a rare example of an "isha" (pronounced "eesha") suffix Arabic name that is found among African Americans.
-snip-
Shahara
-snip-
This name is usually given as "Sahara" among African Americans.
Shamaine
Shamaya
Shanel
-snip-
This name is usually given as "Chanel" among African Americans.
-snip-
Shanisha
Shantay
-snip-
"Shontae" ("Shonte", "Shauntay" etc) are very frequently found contemporary African American female names.
Shantel
Shantell
Shantelle
Shawntae
Shayla-rynne
Among African Americans, the name "Shayla" is found without the other hyphenated name.
-snip-
Taleah
Taleesha
Talesha
-snip-
"Talesha" is an example of "eesha" suffix names that are relatively common among post 1960s African American female names.
-snip-
Tamecia
-snip-
Among African Americans, "Tamecia" is given as "Tamika".
"Tamika" is pronounced tah-ME-kah. I agree with the following commenter that African Americans in the early 1960s coined the "Tamika" was coined by African from the Japanese as a form of the name "Tamiko":
"It is unlikely that Tamika has anything to do with "tamu"*. It is more likely just an African-American variation of Tamiko. If you check the SSA data you will see that in 1968, the first year both Tamiko and Tamika are among the top 1000, there were more Tamikos born than Tamikas. The name was probably introduced to the United States by the 1963 film _A Girl Named Tamiko_. This film, though about a Japanese woman falling in love with a White American man, was in many ways an anti-racism story. This appealed to African-Americans back in the 1960s, and some of them who saw the movie named daughters Tamiko because of it. The very title of the film of course would encourage this. In American accents, though, Tamiko easily can be mistaken for "Tamika", and since -a is a much more common ending for feminine names in English than -o is, African-American parents who heard the name outside of its film context assumed that "Tamika" was how it should be spelled.
― clevelandkentevans 7/5/2005"
*"Tamu" (mentioned in that comment) was a Swahili female name that was popularized in the early 1970s http://myauctionfinds.com/2012/11/02/readers-ask-about-tamu-and-terri-lee-dolls/.

I believe that the name "Tamu" didn't "take" among African Americans because we don't like the beginning or ending sound of the letter "u".
-snip-
Tanisha
-snip-
The name "Tanisha" (usually pronounced tah-NIS-sha) has several known origins. One origin that's sometimes cited among African Americans is that "Tanisha" means "girl born on Monday" in Hausa. However, that etymology isn't correct. In the Hausa language, "Litinin" is the Hausa word for the English word "Monday". https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=onNnOZL-gqY Days of the Week in Hausa by Learn Hausa with Nadiya Garba, Published on Sep 12, 2016
-snip-
The name "Tanisha" may have been created by combining the beginning of the name "Tanya" with the familiar suffix "isha". Or, I believe less likely, the name "Tanisha" is a variant form of the name of the North Africa nation of "Tunisia".

Although it probably isn't related to how African American coined the name "Tanisha", I recently learned that the Yoruba (Nigeria) element "Tani" means "Who is like?". Two examples of Yoruba names with the element "Tani" are "Tanitoluwa" (Who is like unto God?) and "Tanitoluwami" (Who is like my God?)
https://maternitynest.com/yoruba-names-girls/
-snip-
Tenika
-snip-
"Teneka" ("Tenieka") is a form of the relatively widely found post 1960s African American name "Tamika".
-snip-
Tiana
The name "Tiana" (pronounced tee-AH-nah) is best known because it is the name of the first Black princess in the Disney franchise.
"Tiana is a fictional main character who appears in Walt Disney Pictures' 49th animated feature film The Princess and the Frog (2009). Created by directors Ron Clements and John Musker and animated by Mark Henn, Tiana is voiced by Anika Noni Rose as an adult, while Elizabeth M. Dampier voices the character as a child. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tiana_(Disney)
-snip-
Tisha
-snip-
The name Tisha is best known because of African American actress Tisha Campbell-Martin https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tisha_Campbell-Martin is probably best known as the lead actress in the television sicom Martin. Tisha Campbell-Martin pronounces her name "TEE-sha".

The female name "Teesha" is probably related to this name.
-snip-
Toshia
-snip-
This name is given as "Tasha", "Tosha" among African Americans.
-snip-
U, V
Venetia
Venita
Vonda
W, X
Y, Z
Zion
Among African Americans, the name "Zion" is given relatively frequently to females or males. I have of often seen the name "Zion" paired with the name "Zaire" (zi-AIR) as a twin name, in keeping with the African American custom of giving twins names that begin with the same letter of the alphabet.

****
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Visitor comments are welcome.




Sunday, January 14, 2018

The African American Sources & Other Sources For The Name "Daisha"

Edited by Azizi Powell

Revised January 15, 2018

This pancocojams post provides information and commentary about the African American sources and other sources for the female name "Daisha" and similarly pronounced female names.

This post is part of pancocojams' ongoing series on distinctive names and nicknames.

The content of this post is presented for etymological and cultural purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.

DISCLAIMER:
This article does not indicate or imply that African American females are the only ones with the name "Daisha" or similarly pronounced names. However, this post does indicate that the majority of females with those names are African American.

****
PANCOCOJAMS NOTE
This recent article about a Louisiana teacher with the name "Deyshia" was the impetus for this post:
From https://www.today.com/news/handcuffed-teacher-deyshia-hargrave-opens-about-her-arrest-school-board-t121073
Handcuffed teacher Deyshia Hargrave opens up about her arrest at school board meeting

Jan. 11, 2018 at 8:52 AM Eun Kyung Kim

The Louisiana teacher who was handcuffed after being kicked out of a school board meeting in which she questioned the superintendent’s hefty pay raise is speaking out in her first interview following her arrest and encouraging others to take a stand.

A video of the dramatic arrest of Deyshia Hargrave has sparked outrage after the middle school English teacher spoke up Monday night at a Vermilion Parish School Board meeting.”...
-snip-
A photograph of Deyshia Hargrave and two videos are embedded in this article. Both videos include the pronunciation of the name “Deyshia” as "DAY-shah" or "DAY-shuh".

For the purpose of this post, it's important to note that Deyshia Hargrave appears to be a White woman. Prior to reading this article, because of her given name, I assumed that this teacher was Black. My (probably) erroneous assumption was based on the fact that the only people I knew or had heard of with the name "Daisa" (and similarly pronounced names) are Black. My assumption was also based on the fact that the name "Daisha" end with the "sha" sound which is very popular among contemporary (late 1960 to date) African Americans.

As a preface to a compilation of excerpts about the name "Daisha", here's a note that I included in some previous pancocojams post about distinctive African American names:

"African Americans are known to have a larger name pool than most population groups within the United States. Distinctive African American names include names that aren't commonly given in the United States. These names may be from traditional African languages, or from Arabic, or from other languages throughout the world, including certain names from European languages and from Hebrew which aren't that familiar in the United States. Distinctive African American names are also names that are newly created using a number of different strategies. Among these naming strategies are:
-respelling an already existing name so that it more closely fits how it is pronounced

-adding a certain prefix or a certain suffix to an already existing name or to a spelling variant of an existing name, or to a relatively newly coined name. For example, the prefix "La" is mostly, but not only added to certain female names, the prefix "De" is mostly but not always added to certain male names, the suffix "isha" is only added to female names, and the suffix "ious" is only added to male names.

-using capital letter for the first letter that occurs after a prefix

-adding an apostrophe or a hyphen in a name

-combining parts of two names (usually the names of the child's parents) to create the child's name

My interest in what I refer to as "distinctive" African American given names (meaning "first and middle names") was sparked when I received my "African free name"* "Azizi" in 1968. "African free names" is a term that afrocentric African Americans used in the late 1960s and 1970s to refer to traditional African or Arabic given names (or less often, to African or Arabic first names and last names) that were either chosen by individuals or given to individuals by other people. "Free names" replaced the European/Hebrew birth names which were called "slave names".

My name "Azizi" is a Swahili form of the Arabic female name "Aziza". In part because of Swahili's close relationship with Arabic, that East African and Central African language was the first traditional African languages that African Americans used as a source for our names and our children's names. Thanks to the availability of published books on African names in the 1970s, more African Americans began choosing given names from Akan, from Yoruba, Zulu, and from certain other traditional African languages.

[...]

A name could be spelled "the regular way" or spelled differently to more closely conform to the way it sounds. The first letter in the second syllable could be capitalized and/or an apostrophe or hyphen could separate the first syllable from the second syllable. Less often, the name could include an accent mark.

...the African American custom of conferring distinctive given names began centuries before the late 1960s and 1970s, although that custom appears to have increased since the late 1960s and on. And it's important to note that some distinctive African American originated personal names are more common (among African Americans) than other distinctive African American originated personal names. Also, some people who aren't Black have names that are African American originated or which are most popular among African Americans.
-snip-
My informal research on African American naming customs leads me to conclude that -for some reason or another- many African Americans have particular preferences for certain sounds. (My position is that other populations also have different sound preferences and I believe that sound preferences within a specific population can change over time). As such, I think that the name "Daisha" is "liked" by many African Americans because we generally have a preference for the "sha" and (to a lesser extent) "cha" prefixes and suffixes.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2015/05/arabic-names-that-begin-with-sh-or-ch.html for the pancocojams post "Arabic Names That Begin With "Sh" or "Ch". Links to a pancocojams post on Jamaican names that begin with "sh" or "ch" and a pancocojams post on Swahili names & Igbo names that begin with "sh" or "ch" are included in that post.

*Note that http://www.just-think-it.com/sbn/mormon-f.htm "1,500,000 baby names FEMALE Mormon baby names" includes "Deja" as a distinctive Mormon given name.

Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2018/01/distinctive-names-that-are-used-by-some.html for a pancocojams entitled "Distinctive Names That Are Used By Some African Americans & By Some Mormons"

Also, click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2011/09/how-i-got-my-african-name.html for the 2011 pancocojams post entitled "How I Got My African Name".

Also, click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/10/some-distinctive-african-american.html for a pancocojams post entitled Some Distinctive African American Female Names That Begin With "La". The link to the pancocojams post "Distinctive African American Male Names That Begin With "La" "is given in that post.


** Of course, all names were "made up" at one time or another.

****
SUMMARIZING MY OPINIONS REGARDING THE ETYMOLOGY OF THE NAME "DAISHA" (and similarly pronounced names)
-"Daisha" (and similarly pronounced names) is a given female name that originated in the United States.

-"Daisha" appears to usually be pronounced DAY-shah, but might also be pronounced other ways.

-Most of the females in the United States who have the name "Daisha" are Black, however there are non-Black females who also have that name. (Read comments #10, #30, and #42 in Except #2) below.

--"Daisha" appears to be of relatively recent origin among African Americans (1980s on*). However, the similar spelled (and pronounced?) female names "Diasia" is included Newbell Niles Puckett's list of 1877 - 1937 list of Black American names (as indicated on page 265 of Elza Dinwiddie-Boyd's book Proud Heritage: 11,001 Names for your African American Baby).

* According to http://www.thinkbabynames.com/meaning/0/Deja : "Deja entered the list in 1980-1989 and reached its peak position of #182 in the U.S. in the year 1996, and is presently at #1947. (2016 BIRTH STATISTICS)"

-The contemporary (1980s on) use of the name "Daisha" is probably not related to the somewhat similar female name "Dessie". That name is also included in Newbell Niles Puckett's list of 1877 - 1937 list of Black American names (as indicated on page 265 of Elza Dinwiddie-Boyd's book Proud Heritage: 11,001 Names for your African American Baby.)

-The female name "Daisha" may be related to Sherley Anne Williams' 1986 historical novel entitled Dessa Rose about an enslaved Black female with that name https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dessa_Rose may have influenced the creation of the name "Daisha", but I doubt that that name account for the increased selection of that name by Black American. Also, the name "Daisha" predates that book. The earliest date for this name that is given in the comment section of Excerpt #2 in this post is 1980 (comment #44 below).

-From various online comments it appears that the main source for the coinage of the name "Daisha" is the purposely respelled word "deja" from the French term "deja vu". This respelling of the word "Deja" and its use as a given name was heavily influenced by Black model/actress Tyra Banks played the character "Deja" in the n the 1995 African American movie Higher Learning.

-"Daisha" could also be created from combining portions of two already existing given names (such as "David" and "Keisha".

-"Daisha" may sometimes be coined from the Latin name "Dacia" (an ancient Roman province)

-"Daisha" isn't usually derived from the Russian nickname "Dasha" which rhymes with the nickname "Sasha".

-"Daisha" is also probably not related to the Ethiopian name "Dessie" (a place name meaning "my joy") which also has been used as a female given name. Click https://wollo.org/local-history-dessie/ for a detailed Ethiopian article about "Dessie". However, since there's no established meaning for the name "Daisha", that meaning could be used for that name.

-The relative familiarity (among African Americans) with the female name "Daisha" can be partly attributed to that population's high familiarity with the (usually) male name "Deshaun" (and similarly spelled names such as "DaShawn". These contemporary African American originated names are pronounced "DAY-shawn".

-"Daisha" isn't an Arabic name, nor does it necessarily mean "being alive"*. Those idea likely came from the erroneous assumption that "Daisha" is a form of the Arabic female name "Aisha" which means "Life". However, "Aisha" is pronounced "i-EE-sha". But few people report the name "Daisha" being pronounced that way. That said, that meaning could be given for the name "Daisha" as there is not established meaning for that name.

*as indicated on http://www.thenamemeaning.com/daisha/
and
http://www.momjunction.com/articles/muslim-baby-girl-names-with-their-meanings_00330274/#gref
"Daisha:
This feminine Arabic origin name peaked in popularity in the year 1995. So if you want a distinctive name for your daughter, pick this name, meaning ‘alive’."
-snip-
"Daisha" and similarly spelled names aren't included in lists of female Arabic names such as http://tadeebulquran.com/muslim-girls-names-d/

**
Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/10/aisha-and-maisha-name-origins-meanings.html
"Aisha" And "Maisha" (Name Origins, Meanings, Variants, And Pronunciations)

****
EXCERPTS FROM ONLINE ARTICLES ABOUT THE NAME "DAISHA"
These excerpts are given in no particular order and are numbered for referencing purposes only.

EXCERPT #1
From http://www.baby-girl-names.org/d/daisha.htm

[...]

Daisha first appeared in the top thousand girl or boy names during 1995, which is the first year shown on the table. Daisha last appeared in either or both of these name lists during 2001,

[...]

During the last 125 years, parents have used Daisha as a girl's name nearly 100% of the time and almost never as a boy's name. Cumulative counts and total counts shown on the above tables are significantly lower than actual counts because the name Daisha appears in the top 1,000 girl names only 7 times during the last 125 years.

****
EXCERPT #2
From http://www.babynameshub.com/girl-names/Daisha.html
Daisha


..."A few facts about the girl's name Daisha:

Records indicate that 1,833 girls in the United States have been named Daisha since 1880.
The greatest number of people were given this name in 1995, when 313 people in the U.S. were given the name Daisha. Those people are now 21 years old.

So ... how do we know this stuff? Baby Names Hub identifies trends by analyzing vast amounts of data made available by the U.S. government and other public sources. This data, including social security statistics, provides detailed information on baby name popularity and trends in the United States.

[...]

[Pancocojams notes: These are selected examples of comments about the name "Daisha" that were given on that page. Note that some commenters indicate that they are White but people think thought that they were Black because of that name. I've added numbers to these comments for referencing purposes only.]

1. "my name is Daisha (day-sha) and i was boorn in 1998 and i love my Name even though people seem to pronounce it wrong they say Day-Jah its annoying but i always say the sh makes what sound. shh day-shha" May. 4, 2013:

**
2. "My name is Daisha (day-sha) and I am always surprised when people actually pronounce it correctly! Usually I get day-eesha or day-jaa. It doesn't bother me though, it is very unique and beautiful, thanks mom!" Jun. 20, 2012:

**
3. "my name is Daisha and i never knew how many people had my name. i met some people with my name before, hate when people pronounce it wrong but its unique and my dad got it from a song he heard." Jan. 27, 2011:

**
4. "I Love My Name. Its Dai'Sha Vaughna And I Think Its Very Unique But People Have That Name And Make It Ghetto ." Jan. 14, 2011:

**
5. "I NAMED MY BEAUTIFUL DAUGHTER DAISHA BC MY VERY FIRST BEST FRIEND WAS NAMED DACIA AND I NAMED HER AFTER THAT GIRL I JUS SPELLED IT DIFFRENTLY ITS PRONOUCED DAY-SHA!:) ITS A BEAUTIFUL" Dec. 14, 2010: Report as inappropriate

**
6. "my name is Daisha and people mispronounce it and i like that its unique and my mom got it from a song called "i love you Daisha" i hate it that people kept calling me die-asha and Dasha what kind of name is that? i never knew so many people had my name i only knew my cousin had my name my is pronounced Daja but my dad wanted it spelled with a s but my mom didn't o well i love my name :)" Dec. 3, 2010:

**
7. "My name is Daisha and it's pronounced day-sha. It gets mis-pronounced on a weekly basis (deja, di-eesha, deesha.) I love it though and wouldn't change it for the world. It is unique!" Oct. 5, 2010:

**
8. "I named my daughter Daisha. It's pronounced like Deja." Jan. 18, 2010

**
9. "Our daughter is named Daisha. We found the name in a book of baby names and changed the spelling form Dacia to Daisha when she was born in 1986. Still many people mispronounce it. We know of two other Daishas named since our daughter was born" Nov. 19, 2009:

**
10. "My name is Daisha and I am 31 years old! I never heard of anyone else with my name until I was 17 years old, back in 1995! I HATED my name when I was younger- but I love how different it is now... And it is funny, because I am a pale pasty white girl and when people meet me they do a double take and almost always say "You're white? Where did your parents get that name?" I have learned to smile and say "My mom was a hippy" That gets a chuckle. I love my name and am so glad I am no longer the only person in the world with it!! =)" Sep. 16, 2009:

**
11. "i named my daughter daisha in 2005 ... i thought i made it up lol untill i googled it one day . :-} i love this name and so does every person that meets her. We have met some DEJA'S around my city but no daisha's. we pronounce it day-sha ... my name is dana so one day my daughter told me our names sound alike and she likes our names i thought that was cute. this is a name for a princess" May. 25, 2009

**
12. "My oldest child name is Daisha.. I also thought I made it up my name is keisha and my husband name is david.I guess I didnt" Aug. 11, 2008

**
13. "i love my name cuz it is unique and not everyone has it..but my school it is like 2 girls with my name dacia,daja, but really my full name is adaisha so that makes me stand out ya digg.. ***LOvE AdAiShA LeShAY" Jul. 22, 2008

**
14. "I am actually a Daisha. My mom met a "daisha" but spelled differently. then she changed it up a little and now i am who i am! i like to be unique. hard to find the meaning though. :(" Jul. 9, 2008

**
15. "i LOVE MY NAME AND OMG ITS SO MANY PEOPLE WITH MY NAME LOL HOW TIGHT BUT MY NAME IS DAY-SHA LOL BUT SPELLED DAISHA AND A LOT PEOPLE SAY THE I WITH A E AND I HATE THAT BUT MY FRIENDS SAY MY NAME IS GEHTTO BUT I LOVE MY NAME AND NOT MANY POEPLE HAVE IT IN MY STATE SO IT YOU LIVE IN ST.LOUIS MO AND THIS IS YO NAME PLEASE CHAT WITH ME" Jun. 22, 2008

**
16. "i named my daughter daisha ... i thought i made it up ! lol well i love it and so does everyone else . i have yet to meet any one with it im from nj and there are alot of dejas but thats about it. i try not to say her name to much in public because i always hear people say hey i like that name and i dont want them to steal it !! ;-) nice to hear how older girls love there name i hope my daughter does when she grows up . Daisha is a very unique name fit for a queen !" Jun. 3, 2008

**
17. "My husband and I found the name "Dacia" in a baby book and, as a previous person to post on this site, changed the spelling to "Daisha" as we liked its look better. Yes, it is mispronounced quite often. A lot of people pronounce it like "Dash a" I think it should be clear how to say it but whatever. Everytime her name comes up we are told how beautiful it is and I agree. Her first and middle name are beautiful together - "Daisha Rose"" May. 25, 2008

**
18. "My name is Daisha; pronounced Day-sha!! I love my name...it's eccentric as am I!!! Yes it's always pronounced wrong, written wrong, etc. People are stupid...if you sound it out it sounds just like it's spelled!! BEAUTIFUL NAME!!!" Apr. 24, 2008

**
19. "my name is daisha. People mispronounce my name all the time its DAY sha! i dont like it when people put TA and La infront of Daisha its sounds awful!" Apr. 24, 2008

**
20. "Hi, my name is Daisha:pronounced Day-sha." I often get called many different names; such as Die- eja, or even Daisy!" I know, Daisy?" Anyway, i actually prefer people to pronounce it "Deja" like Deja Vu." I thought i was the only one with this name, but i guess not!" Mar. 23, 2008

**
21. "My name is Daisha, pronounced 'Day-sha' and in high school my not-so-funny economics teacher thought it was funny to call me "De ja vu.""

**
22. "my name is daisha, school was horrible no one could ever get it right they always said daja or die-shay." Aug. 4, 2007

**
23. "My name is Daisha and I have had some crazy experiences with it. I love my name dearly, but sometimes its such a pain to have a name that no one can pronounce. The most common mispronunciation would be something along the lines of die-ee-sha. Odd." Dec. 28, 2006

**
24. "I named my daughter Daisha because my name is La'keisha and my husband name is David. she was born in 1990 and I thought she was the only one with that name.....lol now ity is so popular... I ALSO have a daughter name dalea pronounced dah-lee-ah and a son named Da'nyre pronouced dah-ny-ree"

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25. "My name is Daisha. It is also pronounced DAY SHA. I like my name. I think it's beautiful. As a unique person, my name helps define me. At first galance, people often call me D-sha, Deja, Dashya, Die-ee-sha. But it does not bother me, I like to correct them." Oct. 25, 2006

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26. "I love my name. When I was young I hated it because it was unique and now that I am an adult (25) I love it BECAUSE it is unique. I am now making it my goal to name all my kids with unique names. One down ??? to go!! My name is pronounced Daysha (and I do wish it were spelled that way) because I have been called mostly Dai'sha or Dashia. But my mom says she was thinking of the pronounciation of Daisy when choosing the spelling of my name!!! I do know another Daisha, but she spells it Dacia (pronounced the same as mine)!! I am happy to say though that I don't hear it that often at all!!" Aug. 1, 2006

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27. "my name i is daisha(day-shuh) my mom said she got it from a little girl she used to baby sit but hers was pronounced "deja) she said she just changed it a little,i never liked my name because no one could prononuce it but i have grown to love it thanks mom! congrats to all daisha's we have a great name" Jun. 17, 2006

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28. "I was born in 1989 and my name id Daisha Sharee'! You say my name like this Day-Shuh Shuh-Ree! I have never met another Daisha in my life I heard of Dayjah's but no Daisha's I love my name because it is different. I think names are very important and I gave my little girl a unique name for that reason. Her name is Xzalyah Shante'se! You say it like this X-Zal-Yuh Shan-Teese!" May. 24, 2006

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29. "My name is Daishea I have one extra letter I have never met anyone with my name. You pronouce my name Day-she-a." May. 7, 2006

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30. "Alot of people think I'm black because of my name, but I'm not. It's odd. Kind of funny. But great. Oh and my name is Daisha pronounced Day-Sha and I know of another girl in this town with the same name as me." Mar. 30, 2006

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31. "My daughter's name is Daisha, it is pronounced Day Sha, but she always get called Danisha." Mar. 17, 2006

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32. "My Name Is Pronounced Day-Sha.I love My Name It is Very Proper And It is Special.People Say My Name Is Unique And They Call Me Da-Isha Or Daisy.At First I didn't Like It But I started To Love It Like Everyone Else." Feb. 8, 2006

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33. "My name is also DAISHA and is pronounced day-sha. People generally had a harder time saying it correctly when I was younger but, now I am 23 and my friends learned quickly how to pronounce it correctly. I have met other girls with the name Daisha but they all spelled it completely different and pronounced it as deja'. I love my name because it is very different and I grew or "developed" a personality to fit the uniqueness of my name. :)" Jan. 28, 2006: Report as inappropriate

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34. "My name is Daisha also. Pronounced Dai'-sha. I had some trouble growing up because for some reason people always wanted to throw in an invisible "n" and call me Danisha. I've learned to love my name despite people's difficulty saying it." Sep. 10, 2005:

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35. "This is a great name! As you can probably tell, it is my name. I, however, spell my name DaiSha. The "a" sound is long, and people often say "Oh, like daisy." It was very unique, but I once thought it was too unique. Now, my husband and I have given our three girls even more unique names than mine, and I'm okay okay with that now. Very rarely do people pronounce my name correctly at first glance; they'll always say D-Shay or Deja, and it did bother me. I began to just correct them politely by answering their salutations "This is DaiSha" or "It's DaiSha--just change the 'y' to 'i' and add -sha." It;s who I am now and I love it!!!" Jul. 12, 2005

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36. "it is pronounced day-shuh. people somtimes spell it daysha or dashia. I've never met some one my age named daisha" Jul. 9, 2005

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37. "I love my name. (day-sha) people often say it like Die-ishia. Ive grown to lik it. Ive met people with my name and I have 2 cousins with the same name. I love that its unique and not lik isabella or amanda ;) those are popular and boring namea" Jul. 22, 2012

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38. "my name is De'Shah (Day-Sha) i have a love/hate relationship w/ it. i get called deshawn deshay deshawna deaishia ugh its just seems like a half name like it should be more" Sep. 19, 2011:

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39. "MY NAME IS DACIA PRONOUNCED DAISHA GROWING UP IN THE 70'S, AND 80'S I NEVER HEARD ANYONE WITH THAT NAME. I LOVE MY NAME IT IS VERY UNIQUE AND AS TIME GO BY I HEAR IT MORE AND MORE. IT WAS GIVEN TO ME FROM MY DAD." Feb. 28, 2011

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40. "My name is D'Aisha pronounced (Die-ee-sha) my name get mispronounce on a daily basis even when I was little. I got so used to it that mostly I just go alone with how people would pronounce it unless they are way off..I love my name!! Thanx auntie!!" Oct. 25, 2010:

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41. "Well I am 29 years old and my name is Dahisha. Some different, but i like it a lot." Jun. 2, 2010:

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42. "GRAND DAUGHTER THEY ASK IF SHE IS BLACK WHEN SHE NOT WITH ME" Apr. 15, 2010

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43. "My daughters name is Daisha. I thought I was being creative and I thought I invented it for her. Her grand father's name is David plus her great grandfather's name Elisha. I combined the two names. Hence: Daisha. I love it." Mar. 2, 2010:

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44. "I named my oldest daughter Daisha born, 1980. I received that name from someone I had met in a Payless store while I was pregnant with her. Her father and uncle changed the spelling from the baby book spelling Dacia to Daisha. I was not so excited about the spelling change but it made his family happy to contribute to her naming. That was most important to me. Daisha LOVES her name." Apr. 26, 2008:

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45. "i thought i was the first one to use this name i live in holland... nobody i know has the same name i pronounce it like the word deja veu because thats the most beautyfull way to say it" Jan. 10, 2008: "i thought i was the first one to use this name i live in holland... nobody i know has the same name i pronounce it like the word deja veu" Jan. 10, 2008:

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46. "my name is Daisha.I am nine years old and I live in the u.k.I dont know anyone else called Daisha and when I tell people my name, they always ask me to tell them again which is quite annoying but I`m used to it now.I don't know any other Daishas in this country.At fist I didn't really like my name but now I think it's kinda cool." Dec. 11, 2006:

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47. "My baby girl is Daisha people often compliment the name but sometimes she gets called Dah Isha. In Navajo it means little sister." Nov. 26, 2006

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48. "my name is Daisha it's pronouced Day-sha I have never met any one with my name, people always say daija but i always correct them because i hate when people screw it up. I have always loved my name" Nov. 16, 2006:

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49. "My name is LaDaisha i get called Daisha most of the time the only way others have a hard time with my name it seems like if they are "TEACHERS"" Nov. 14, 2006:

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50. "My name is Daisha!It is pronounced DAY-SHA!!People call me DEJA,DAIAISHA,DAI'ISHA.i'VE been called that so many times I am used to it now,but I still would like someone to call me by my real name!!" Sep. 25, 2006:

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51. "My Name is Daisha, and all the theachers say me danisha , and a lot of diferents names but always my friends tell me ýWhat is your name Daýsha or Daisha and i dont now _DVM" Sep. 15, 2006

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52. "my name is Daisha and its pronounced Day Sha alot of people have problems saying it. its a very beautiful name and i love it!" Sep. 12, 2006:

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53. "I have a daughter name "Daisha" and never heard any where else! I got it from the boys name Daishaun, I have never had a problem with anyone saying her name wrong! I think it is a beautiful name!" Aug. 28, 2006

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54. "My daughters name is Daisha...pronounced with a long a...we named her in 1993.We have never met anyone with the same name." Aug. 15, 2006:

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55. "My name is spelled Daysha, and I have always loved it, even though most people don't pronounce it correctly. I get compliments all the time, and two of my classmates even named their daughters Daysha!! Since college, I have met probably 4-5 people with my name." Jul. 25, 2006
"my name is daisha but no one seems to know the meaning of this name i have heard of other daisha's out there but havent met any most people think that i am african american when gthey hear my name" Jul. 6, 2006

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56. "i named my daughter daishanai (day-sha-naa)she adjusted well its different and she is beautiful like her name ..so, it worked out" May. 8, 2006: Report as inappropriate

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Saturday, January 13, 2018

Amiri Baraka - "Why Is We Americans" (spoken word/poetry)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases the poem/spoken word "Why Is We Americans" by Amiri Baraka (also known as Imamu Amiri Baraka; and LeRoi Jones)

Information about Amiri Baraka is given in the Addendum to this post.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, sociological, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Amiri Baraka for his life's legacy. Thanks also to all those who are quoted in this post. Thanks also to the publisher of this video on YouTube.

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SHOWCASE VIDEO: Def Poetry - Amiri Baraka - Why is We Americans



urbanrenewalprogram, Published on Aug 26, 2010

Amiri Baraka in Season 1 Episode 4 of Def Poetry Jam

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TEXT - "WHY IS WE AMERICANS" by AMIRI BARAKA

From https://genius.com/Amiri-baraka-why-is-we-americans-excerpt-annotated
"[Intro:]
Without further ado, ladies and gentlemen, the legendary Amiri Baraka.

[Amiri Baraka:]
This is an excerpt from a poem called: Why is We Americans. But reality is an excerpt on Television.

Why is We Americans? Why is We Americans?

Bu-de-daaaa. Bu-de-daaaa. Bu-de-daaaa. Bu-de-daaaa. Bu-do-do. Be-De-De-De-Bu-De-Bu-Bup-Boo-Boo.

What I want is me. For real. I want me and my self. And what that is is what I be and what I see and feel and who is me in the. What it is, is who it is, and when it me its what is be….I’m gone be here, if I want, like I said, self determination, but I ain’t come from a foolish tribe, we wants the mule the land, you can make it three hundred years of blue chip stock in the entire operation. We want to be paid, in a central bank the average worker farmer wage for all those years we gave it free. Plus we want damages, for all the killings and the fraud, the lynchings, the missing justice, the lies and frame-ups, the unwarranted jailings, the tar and featherings, the character and race assassinations. historical slander, ugly caricatures, for every sambo, step and fechit flick, we want to be paid, for every hurtful thing you did or said. For all the land you took, for all the rapes, all the rosewoods and black wall streets you destroyed. All the mis-education, jobs loss, segregated shacks we lived in, the disease that ate and killed us, for all the mad police that drilled us. For all the music and dances you stole. The styles. The language. The hip clothes you copped. The careers you stopped. All these are suits, specific litigation, as represent we be like we, for reparations for damages paid to the Afro-American nation.

Bu-de-daaaa. Bu-de-daaaa. Bu-de-daaaa.

We want education for all of us and anyone else in the black belt hurt by slavery. For all the native peoples even them poor white people you show all the time as funny, all them abners and daisy maes, them Beverly Hill Billies who never got to no beverly hills. who never got to Harvard on they grandfathers wills. we want reparations for them, right on, for the Mexicans whose land you stole. For all of North Mexico you call Texas, Arizona, California, New Mexico, Colorado, all that, all that, all that, all that, Bu-de-daaaa do do bap bap bap baaa du de do.
All that you gotta give up, autonomy and reparations. To the Chicanos, and the Native Americans, who souls you ripped out with their land, give Self-Determination, Regional autonomy, that’s what my we is askin, and they gon do the same. when they demand it, like us again, in they own exploited name. Yeh the education that’s right two hundred…years. We want a central stash, a central bank, with democratically elected trustees, and a board elected by us all, to map out, from the referendum we set up, what we want to spend it on. To build that Malcolm sense Self-Determination as Self-Reliance and Self Respect and Self Defense, the will of what the good Dr. Du Bois beat on – true self consciousness. Simply the psychology of Freedom.

Bu-de-daaaa Bu-de-daaaa Pu de-daaaa Pu de-daaaa bap bap bap bap bu de bu de bu de bu bu.

Then we can talk about bein American. Then we can listen – then we can listen without the undercurrent of desire to first set your ass on fire. We will only talk of voluntary unity, of autonomy, as vective arms of self-determination. If there is democracy in you that is where it will be shown. this is the only way we is Americans. This is the only truth that can be told. OTHERWISE there is no future between us but war. And we is rather lovers and singers and dancers and poets and drummers and actors and runners and elegant heartbeats of the suns flame….but we is also to the end of our silence and sitdown. We is at the end of being under your ignorant smell your intentional hell. Either give us our lives or plan to forfeit your own.
-snip-
About "Why Is We Americans" created by atrklja, 2014
"This excerpt was originally part of the first season of the HBO spoken-word series titled Def Jam Poetry, which aired from the years 2002-2007. Artists featured on the show include Dave Chappelle,The Last Poets, Jewel, Jamie Foxx as well as many others. Russel Simmons, co-creator, was quoted stating that “… artists feel their voices are powerful and they’re going to use them more, I think, in promoting social change in political climates that affect their ideas” in relation to the series and it’s impact (Ogg). The show has since been granted the Tony Award, the Peabody Award, been on Broadway as well as produced a book. “Why is We Americans” excerpt can also be found as a part of a longer feature on his life provided by the site Democracy Now.

Baraka himself was known as an influential Civil Rights Activist as well as a Poet, Critic, Writer and Scholar. Having been involved and influenced by Beat poetry, Black Nationalism and Marxism, Amiri changed his views on his art and it’s purpose throughout his life. While this poem is situated during the later years of his artistry, his varied political and social beliefs remain a feature within this work. He specifically discusses the tension created by the Civil War in American from a black perspective. Both style and prose in “Why is We Americans” are characteristic of his reputation of being a controversial artist, often receiving mixed reviews of his work."
-snip-
This comment is reformatted for this pancocojams post to enhance its readability.

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ADDENDUM: INFORMATION ABOUT AMIRI BARAKA

Amiri Baraka (1934-2014): Poet-Playwright-Activist Who Shaped Revolutionary Politics, Black Culture



Democracy Now!, Published on Jan 10, 2014

http://www.democracynow.org - We spend the hour looking at the life and legacy of Amiri Baraka, the poet, playwright and political organizer who died Thursday at the age of 79. Baraka was a leading force in the black arts movement of the 1960s and 1970s. In 1963 he published "Blues People: Negro Music in White America," known as the first major history of black music to be written by an African American. A year later he published a collection of poetry titled "The Dead Lecturer" and won an Obie Award for his play, "Dutchman." After the assassination of Malcolm X in 1965 he moved to Harlem and founded the Black Arts Repertory Theater. In the late 1960s, Baraka moved back to his hometown of Newark and began focusing more on political organizing, prompting the FBI to identify him as "the person who will probably emerge as the leader of the pan-African movement in the United States." Baraka continued writing and performing poetry up until his hospitalization late last year, leaving behind a body of work that greatly influenced a younger generation of hip-hop artists and slam poets. We are joined by four of Baraka's longtime comrades and friends: Sonia Sanchez, a renowned writer, poet, playwright and activist; Felipe Luciano, a poet, activist, journalist and writer who was an original member of the poetry and musical group The Last Poets; Komozi Woodard, a professor of history at Sarah Lawrence College and author of "A Nation Within a Nation: Amiri Baraka and Black Power Politics"; and Larry Hamm, chairman of the People's Organization for Progress in Newark, New Jersey.

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From https://www.biography.com/people/amiri-baraka-9198235
"Amiri Baraka is an African-American poet, activist and scholar. He was an influential black nationalist and later became a Marxist.

Synopsis
Amiri Baraka (formerly LeRoi Jones) was born in Newark, New Jersey, on October 7, 1934. After three years in the U.S. Air Force, Jones joined the Beat movement in Greenwich Village. After the assassination of Malcolm X, he took the name Amiri Baraka and became involved in the Black Nationalist poetry and literature scenes. He later identified himself as a Marxist. Baraka died on January 9, 2014 at the age of 79.

Early Life
Amiri Baraka was born Everett LeRoi Jones on October 7, 1934, in Newark, New Jersey. After developing an interest in poetry and jazz in high school, Baraka attended Howard University, where he changed his name to LeRoi James. He earned his degree in English in 1954, and then joined the United States Air Force. After three years of service, Baraka received a dishonorable discharge for owning inappropriate texts.

Baraka then moved to Manhattan, where, in addition to attending Columbia University and The New School, he became a prominent artist in the Greenwich Village scene and befriended Beat poets such as Allen Ginsberg and Jack Kerouac. He published their and other poets' work in the newly founded Totem Press. In 1961, Baraka published his first major collection of poetry, Preface to a Twenty Volume Suicide Note. His 1964 play, The Dutchman, which addressed racial tensions and American blacks' repressed hostility toward whites, gained him fame and acclaim.

Political Activism
After a trip to Cuba, Baraka disassociated with the apolitical Beat movement in favor of addressing racial politics. The assassination of Malcolm X was a turning point in his life. Afterward, he disavowed his old life—including his marriage to Hettie Cohen—and changed his name to Amiri Baraka. He became a black nationalist, moved to Harlem and founded the Black Arts Repertory Theatre/School. The company dissolved after a few months, however, and Bakara moved back to Newark and founded the Spirit House Players. Baraka fully immersed himself in Newark, becoming a leader of the city's African-American community.

In 1968, Baraka became a Muslim and added the prefix Imamu, meaning "spiritual leader," to his name. In 1974, however, he dropped the prefix, identifying as a Marxist.

Later Life & Death
Baraka is known for his aggressive, incendiary style. His writing is controversial and has often polarized readers. His poem "Somebody Blew up America," suggesting that Israel and American leaders knew of the 9/11 attacks before they happened, was condemned for being anti-Semitic. After the public outcry against the poem, Baraka was fired from his position as New Jersey's poet laureate.

A prolific writer, Baraka has penned more than 50 books, including fiction, music criticism, essays, short stories, poetry and plays. In 1984, he published The Autobiography of LeRoi Jones/Amiri Baraka. He's taught at many universities, including the New School for Social Research, San Francisco State University and Yale University. Before retirement, he served as professor emeritus of Africana Studies at the State University of New York at Stony Brook for 20 years.

Baraka died on January 9, 2014 in Newark, New Jersey at the age of 79. He is survived by his wife, Amina Baraka, two daughters from his first marriage and four children from his second.

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From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amiri_Baraka
..."In 1967, Baraka (still Leroi Jones) visited Maulana Karenga in Los Angeles and became an advocate of his philosophy of Kawaida, a multifaceted, categorized activist philosophy that produced the "Nguzo Saba," Kwanzaa, and an emphasis on African names.[9] It was at this time that he adopted the name Imamu Amear Baraka.[1] Imamu is a Swahili title for "spiritual leader", derived from the Arabic word Imam (إمام). According to Shaw, he dropped the honorific Imamu and eventually changed Amear (which means "Prince") to Amiri.[1] Baraka means "blessing, in the sense of divine favor."[1]”...
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As a member of the cultural nationalist organization Committee For Unified Newark (CFUN) from 1967-August 1969. During most of that time Amiri Baraka was the head of that organization and was known by the title "Imamu".

I was aware that Imamu Baraka either was or used to be Muslim, but no Islamic or any other religious teachings were given in that organization. I do however recall that some people (perhaps also Amiri Baraka) voluntarily fasted during the Islamic observation of Ramadan.

I don’t recall Imamu Baraka’s name being spelled “Amear” and not “Amiri” (the standard Swahili spelling of that name).
-snip-
Update: January 14, 2018 3:20 PM
To clarify, from 1967-August 1969 (or possibly beginning in late 1966) that I was a member of the organization that Amiri Baraka eventually led, I was aware that he was or used to be Sunni Muslim. And there were other Sunni Muslims in that organization (for instance, during some of the time that I was a member of that organization I was romantically involved with Zayd Ibn Muhammad, one of the leaders of that organization. He was Sunni Muslim as were some other people, particularly in early 1967 or late 1966. I remember that a number of Muslims left the organization at the same time in protest, because (if I recall correctly) they said that a Sunni Muslim man who had been arrested hadn't receive the support that he should have from that organization.

There were no members of Nation Of Islam in that CFUN cultural nationalist organization- but I remember buying their delicious bean pies and also remember reading their newspaper.

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