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Tuesday, July 25, 2017

Examples Of "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" Children's Rhymes, Part II ("Dirty Versions)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a two part pancocojams series on children' rhymes that begin with the lyrics "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" or include those lyrics in that rhyme, and also use the tune of the 1891 vaudeville and music hall song entitled "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay".

Part II includes excerpts of several online articles about the reasons why children chant anti-social and "rude" rhymes/songs. Part II also showcases selected examples of "sexualized" ("dirty") examples of ""Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" children's rhymes.

WARNING: These examples may be considered unsuitable for children.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/07/examples-of-ta-ra-ra-boom-de-ay.html for Part I of this two part pancocojams series. Part I provides information about the song "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" and includes comments about the reasons why children chant anti-social and "rude" rhymes. Part I also showcases some examples of "clean" (not sexualized) examples of "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" children's rhymes.

The content of this post is presented for folkloric, socio-cultural, and recreational purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.

****
COMMENTS ABOUT WHY CHILDREN CHANT TAUNTING AND/OR ANTI-SOCIAL PARODIES OF SONGS/RHYMES
These excerpts are given in no particular order.
Excerpt #1:
From https://www.bl.uk/playtimes/articles/an-introduction-to-childrens-jokes-and-rude-rhymes
"An introduction to children's jokes and rude rhymes" by Michael Rosen, 26 Oct 2016
"Humour is an important component of children’s play, and nowhere is this more apparent than in their verbal play.

Humour serves a wide range of purposes, allowing children to challenge, undermine and disarm adult power and seriousness, to explore taboo topics as various as sex or toilets, and to experiment with dazzling displays of verbal dexterity. Many funny rhymes are ones which accompany specific games, activities, such as counting out, clapping or skipping. Rude variations of ‘Popeye the Sailor Man’, for example, accompanied clapping games in the mid-20th century. Others are simply performed and passed along for fun. Their humour, their cheek, their rhyme and rhythm, imagery, play on words and frequent parodic trades are all reasons why they appeal to children and why they’re memorable.

An important class of verbal humour is parody. The history of children’s language play abounds in parodic versions of different genres, Christmas carols, pop songs, advertising jingles, Valentine’s Day rhymes, Happy Birthday, football chants, musicals, TV theme songs. The wide variety of genres involved demonstrates a real mixing bowl of popular cultural references, where everything is up for grabs, nothing is sacred and the punch line is all. The sources are equally diverse, other children, adults, comics, books, television, films and the internet."...

****
Excerpt #2
From http://english.ohmynews.com/articleview/article_view.asp?no=381283&rel_no=1
Children Revel in Rude Rhymes: Democracy underpinned by the ability to question and mock authority
by Peter Hinchliffe (Hinchy), Published 2007-12-23
...."Judging by their playground chants and rhymes, children are possessed of a rebellious sense of humor. So it has been down the centuries...

While playing skipping and other games children chant rhymes that break taboos by poking fun at the adult world....

Children who challenge authority with a subversive, and often vulgar, rhyme grow up to be ever wary of authority.

And the ability to question, and sometimes, mock those who would run our lives for us is the firm foundation upon which democracy is built."...

****
Excerpt #3: Subject: RE: We Wear Our Hair In Curls
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 07 Sep 09 - 08:56 PM
http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=123101

From Where Texts and Children Meet by Eve Bearne, Victor Watson (London: Routledge, 2000), page 109:

"There were many other examples of games that seemed to reflect the strong influence of the energy and bravado exhibited and promoted by the Spice Girls. There was evidence of a particular confidence and exuberance in the way the girls were playing, which could be a response to the role models offered by pop groups like the Spice Girls. The following text shares many of these features; the girls who played this game felt that it was definitely taboo as far as adults were concerned. It was accompanied by rather gross and comical mime as they acted out the text, and is a good example of one of the many rhymes, many with long ancestry, that allow girls to 'make fun of the still unknown and rather frightening state of adulthood' (Opie 1997: 210)"

We are the teenage girls.
We wear our hair in curls.
We wear our dungarees
Down to our sexy knees.
I met a boy last night.
He gave me 50p
To go behind a bush
And have it off with me.
My mother was surprised
To see my belly rise,
But daddy jumped for joy.
It was a baby boy.
My mother done the splits
And had fifty fits.

What sort of text is this? Where has it come from?

As Iona Opie suggests, these mocking rhymes often have a long ancestry and this one certainly has an ancestry, if not a very long one. There is a version of 'We are the Teenage Girls' in The Singing Game that can be traced back to the 1970s:
-snip-
Jim Dixon quotes a clean example of 'We Are The ___ Girls" from Opie and Opie's book on children's games in the United Kingdom. That example, titled "We Are The Barbie Girls" and "We Are The Teenage Girls" example given above demonstrate the very close relationship between examples of the "We Are The __ Girls" children's rhyme family and the "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" children's rhyme family. That relationship is particularly evident in the dirty (sexualized) examples of both of those rhymes which share not only the same tune but also many of the same words.

****
Excerpt #4
From http://www.metafilter.com/88294/Rhymes-with-tararaboomdeay Rhymes with ta-ra-ra-boom-de-ay. January 13, 2010 10:16 AM
"One of the research problems that plagues children's folklorists is the fact that kids are reluctant informants. Kids know that adults don't approve of most of their nastier, meaner, dirtier content, and won't share it easily - they don't want to embarass themselves or appear impolite or get in trouble. It's actually one of the hardest cultures for a scholar to penetrate; very insular, and protective of its own knowledge...."
posted by Miko at 11:01 AM on January 13, 2010

[...]

"Side note: A lot of these that are complete song parodies got to kids through the vector of the military. There's some overlap there. WWII generated a ton of popular song parodies that then went everywhere geographically. It doesn't take too many older brothers, big kids, or grandpas singing their off-color songs to pre-teen boys to get that stuff to enter kidlore.
posted by Miko at 1:06 PM on January 13, 2010

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EXAMPLES OF "TA RA RA BOOM DE AY" CHILDREN'S RHYMES (CLEAN VERSIONS)
These examples are given in no particular order and are numbered for referencing purposes only.

DISCLAIMER: This is not meant to be a comprehensive compilation of these rhymes.
1.
I grew up in Western Massachusetts and remember learning the following version in the late 1960's

Ta-ra-ra- boom de-ay
How did I get this way
It was the boy next door
He laid me on the floor
He lifted up my skirt
And gave a little squirt
And right before my eyes
I say my belly rise.
-Tinker, 28 Aug 09, http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=123101, hereafter known as "Mudcat discussion "We Wear Our Hair In Curls"

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2.
we are the great meols girls
we wear our hair in curls
we wear our dungarees
down to our sexy knees.

sha la la bum-shi-ka
sha la la bum-shi-ka

you know the boy next door
he got me on the floor
he counted 1 2 3
and stuck it into me

sha la la bum-shi-ka
sha la la bum-shi-ka

then some other stuff about being pregnant and stuff...
i dunno...i forget. was an awesome song though.

sha la la bum-shi-ka
sha la la bum-shi-ka

okay, now i really can't remember any more...

*edit*
my daddy was suprised
to see my belly rise
my mummy jumped for joy, it was a baby boy


Note: A number of females and a few males (around the same age group) on this British forum indicated that they remembered this rhyme, and posted slightly different versions of it.
-quoted by Azizi Powell, 23 Aug 09 on "Mudcat discussion: We Wear Our Hair In Curls", from -Niamh; 18-03-2007, Location: Near Liverpool, Age: 19 on http://board.muse.mu/showthread.php?t=41853 [discussion site no longer available]

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3.
TAH RAH RAH BOOM DI AY

Tah rah rah bom di ay
I can't come out today
It happened yesterday
The boy across the way
He paid me fifty cents
To go behind the fence
He said it wouldn't hurt
And pushed it up my skirt
My mommy was surprised
To see my belly rise
And hear the baby cry
Tah rah rah bom di ay
-http://mudcat.org/@displaysong.cfm?SongID=5648
-snip-
No demographic information is given with this example.

****
4.
I learned one from my dad, who probably learned it in Toronto, circa 1958.

Tra la la boom de yay
Did you have yours today?
I had mine yesterday
That's why I walk this way!

I always thought it was supposed to be about inoculations, but I never actually asked my dad.
-Merav Hoffman December 9, 2009, comment in discussion of http://playgroundjungle.com/2009/12/ta-ra-ra-boom-de-ay.html "Ta ra ra boom de ay", by thor: Adam Selzer December 7, 2009 (with 74 comments as of July 25, 2017), hereafter given as "playground jungle" article, 2009".
-snip-
I initially included this example in Part I of this series. However, I think that this version has sexual connotations even when this is the entire rhyme. However, that sexualized connotation is "spelled out" in longer versions of this example, as shown below.

****
5.
Mom used to have a little diddy from her school years (Seattle, early 1950's) but cannot remember the last verse… it was:

Tra la la la boom de ay
Have you had yours today?
I had mine yesterday
Thats why I walk this way
He laid me on the couch
All I said was ouch……

Then there were two more lines but she cannot remember them!!! Anyone else know this version?
-Anonymous, October 10, 2011, comment in article "playground jungle" article, 2009

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[Reply]
6.
Tra la la boom de ay
have you had yours today
I had mine yesterday
that's why I feel this way
he laid me on the couch
and all I said was ouch
now junior's on the way
tra la la boom de ay
-Anonymous, November 17, 2011, (Bakersfield, CA 1957), comment in article "playground jungle" article, 2009

****
7.
Tra la la boom de ay
Did you get yours today?
I got mine yesterday
From the boy across the way
He gave me fifty cents
To go behind the fence
He pulled my panties down
And threw me on the ground
My mommy was surprised
To see my belly rise.
I can't go out to play
'Cause Junior's on the way.
-Anonymous, March 30, 2012, comment in article "playground jungle" article, 2009

****
8.
I heard this version in Elmhurst, Queens, circa 1946. I learned it from a friend and sang it to my mother, who was not amused.

Ta-ra-ra-boom-de-ay
Did you get yours today?
I got mine yesterday,
from a boy across the way.
My mother was surprised
to see my stomach rise.
Ta-ra-ra-boom-de-ay, Ta-ra-ra-boom-de-ay.
-Anita Gorman, February 12, 2013, comment in article "playground jungle" article, 2009
-snip-
Pancocojams Editor: "1946" is the earliest date that I've found for "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" children's rhymes , whether they are clean or dirty. I have found other examples dated in the mid to late 1950s. I wonder if this is a typo and the commenter meant to write "1956".

****
9.
from late 50s early 60s MT

ta da da boom de eh
how did I get this way
it was the boy next door
he laid me on the floor
then to my surprise
my tummy began to rise
I remember still how hard
how hard my mommy cried
-la March 17, 2013, comment in article "playground jungle" article, 2009

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10.
Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay
Have you had yours today?
I had mine yesterday
A girl upon the way

I laid her on the couch
And all she said was ouch!
Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay
Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay
- Choti Giri March 27, 2014, comment in article "playground jungle" article, 2009

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11.
1970s-early 80s metro Boston area:

Tra la la boom de ay
How did I get this way?
It was the boy next door
He pushed me on the floor
He shouted 1 2 3
He stuck it into me
My mother was surprised
To see my belly rise
My father jumped for joy
It was a baby boy!

The baby boy part was always said with a sweet little, cutesy turn of voice. Children celebrating rape – what a world
-naydi April 11, 2014, comment in article "playground jungle" article, 2009

****
12.
My friends and I grew up outside of Chicago in the early 1960's and we would sing it with these lyrics:

Ta-ra-ra-boom-de-ay
Ta-ra-ra-boom-de-ay
Did you do yours today?
I did mine yesterday

I paid her fifty cents
To walk across the fence
She laid down on the couch
I shoved mine up her pouch

Her mother was surprised
To see her belly rise
Her dad was overjoyed
It was a baby boy

I have to admit that back then and at that age, the song didn't make much sense to me, but we boys all sang it anyway. It's interesting how many similar yet different versions there are… all local colloquialisms, I suppose. I wonder where the original "got her pregnant" version was started.
-AWG, Chicago area September 29, 2015,comment in article "playground jungle" article, 2009

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13.
New York City – LA LA LA Boom Shaday Can’t Come Outside Today What Happened Yesterday A Boy Came Past My Way He Gave Me Fifty Cents To Lay Across The Beach He Said It Didn’t Hurt He Pulled Up My Skirt My Mother Is So Thrilled To Hear Its A Baby Boy My Father’s So Disgusted To See My Cherry Busted LA LA LA Boom Shaday Can’t Come Outside Today
-May, November 11, 2016, comment in article "playground jungle" article, 2009

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This concludes Part II of this two part series on "Tra La La Boom De Ay" Children's Rhymes.

Thanks for visiting pancocojams.

Visitor comments are welcome.

Examples Of "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" Children's Rhymes, Part I (Clean Versions)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part I of a two part pancocojams series on children' rhymes that begin with the lyrics "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" or include those lyrics in that rhyme, and also use the tune of the 1891 vaudeville and music hall song entitled "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay".

Part I provides information about the song "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" and includes comments about the reasons why children chant anti-social and "rude" rhymes. Part I also showcases some examples of "clean" (not sexualized) examples of "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" children's rhymes.

Part I provides information about the song "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" and includes excerpts of several online articles about the reasons why children chant anti-social and "rude" rhymes/songs. Part I also showcases some examples of "clean" (not sexualized) examples of "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" children's rhymes.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/07/examples-of-ta-ra-ra-boom-de-ay_25.html for Part II of this series. Part II includes excerpts of several online articles about the reasons why children chant anti-social and "rude" rhymes/songs. Part II also showcases selected examples of "sexualized" ("dirty") examples of ""Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" children's rhymes.

The content of this post is presented for folkloric, socio-cultural, and recreational purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.

****
INFORMATION ABOUT THE SONG "TA RA RA BOOM DE AY"
From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ta-ra-ra_Boom-de-ay
"Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay" is a vaudeville and music hall song. The song's first known public performance was in Henry J. Sayers' 1891 revue Tuxedo, which was performed in Boston, Massachusetts. The song became widely known in the version sung by Lottie Collins in London music halls in 1892.[1] The tune was later used in various contexts, including as the theme song to the television show Howdy Doody.

Background
The song's authorship was disputed for some years.[2] It was originally credited to Sayers, who was the manager of the George Thatcher Minstrels; Sayers used the song in his 1891 production Tuxedo, a minstrel farce variety show in which "Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay" was sung by Mamie Gilroy.[3][4] However, Sayers later said that he had not written the song, but had heard it performed in the 1880s by a black singer, Mama Lou, in a well-known St. Louis brothel run by "Babe" Connors.[1]

Stephen Cooney, Lottie Collins' husband, heard the song in Tuxedo and purchased from Sayers rights for Collins to perform the song in England.[2] Collins worked up a dance routine around it, and, with new words by Richard Morton and a new arrangement by Angelo A. Asher, she first sang the song at the Tivoli Music Hall on The Strand in London in 1891 to an enthusiastic reception; it became her signature tune.[5] She performed it to great acclaim in the 1892 adaptation of Edmond Audran's opérette, Miss Helyett. According to reviews at the time, Collins delivered the suggestive verses with deceptive demureness, before launching into the lusty refrain and her celebrated "kick dance", a kind of cancan in which, according to one reviewer, "she turns, twists, contorts, revolutionizes, and disports her lithe and muscular figure into a hundred different poses, all bizarre".[6]"....
-snip-
Click http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17453&messages=31 http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=17453&messages=31 for a discussion about the origin of "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay", including possible sources for that 19th century vaudeville and music hall song.

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GENERAL DESCRIPTION ABOUT "TA RA RA BOOM DE AY" CHILDREN'S RHYMES
From http://playgroundjungle.com/2009/12/ta-ra-ra-boom-de-ay.html "Ta ra ra boom de ay", by thor: Adam Selzer December 7, 2009 (with 74 comments as of July 25, 2017)
"Parodies of the 1890s tune “Ta rah ra boom de ay” come in two distinct versions: one about a dead teacher, and one about sex. If there’s one about bodily functions out there, it’d be a regular trifecta!

I don’t know the REAL “Ta ra ra boom de ay” song at all, but I do know the dead teacher version. It’s because of this that I thought sauerkraut was a type of fish for years."...
-snip-
At least two commenters shared "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" children parodies about people farting which fits the "bodily functions" description.

In addition to those three categories, a number of "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" children rhymes refer to people loosing their "knickers" (panties) or otherwise being naked.

I include the "dead teacher" versions, the bodily function versions, and loosing "knicker" (panties)/naked person versions of "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" rhymes as "clean" versions of that rhyme family. The "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" rhymes about a girl being raped by a neighborhood boy and giving birth to a baby boy are categorized as "sexualized"/"dirty" versions of that rhyme family.

Although some articles indicate that "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" children's rhymes were "sung" while skipping, it appears that nowadays (and maybe since at least the 1970s) those rhymes are usually sung without any any accompanying movements.

The children's rhyme "We Are The __ Girls/We Wear Our Hair In Curls" is closely related rhyme to "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" rhymes. "We Are The __ Girls" have the same tune as the "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" [song], and has "clean" and "dirty" versions. The words to the "dirty" (sexualized) versions are very similar if not the same as the words to the "dirty" (sexualized) versions of "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay".

Click http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=123101 for a Mudcat folk music discussion thread on "We Are The __ Girls" that I started in 2009. Here's a "clean" version of "We Are The __ Girls":
We are the Barbie girls.
We wear our hair in curls.
We wear our dungarees
To hide our dirty knees.
We wear our father's shirt.
We wear our brother's tie,
And when we want a guy,
We simply wink the eye.

(Opie and Opie The Singing Game, 1985: 478)
-snip-
This example was posted in the above mentioned Mudcat discussion thread by Jim Dixon, 07 Sep 09 - 08:56 PM. It has been traced to the 1970s [United Kingdom].

[Added July 26/1017]

Here's an example of "We wear our hair in curls" that mentions mini-skirts and>/i> includes the "toys/boys" line:

we're scoil mhuire girls!
we wear our hair in curls
we wear our dungarees above our sexy knees!
sha la la boom sha la sha la la boom sha la
we're scoil mhuire girls!
we wear our hair in curls
we wear our daddy's shirts over our mini-skirts!
sha la la boom sha la sha la la boom sha la
we're the scoil mhuire girls! we wear our hair in curls
and when it comes to toys
we'd rather play with boys!
sha la la boom sha la sha la la boom sha la
we're scoil mhuire girls!
we wear our hair in curls we don't smoke or drink
that's what our teachers think!
sha la la boom sha la sha la la boom sha la
-snip-
This example is from a website that is no longer available. On August 26, 2017 I quoted this rhyme in the "We Wear Our Hair In Curls" Mudcat discussion thread whose link is given above.

The "sha la la boom sha la" words are a form of "Ta ra ra boom de ay".

****
COMMENTS ABOUT WHY CHILDREN CHANT TAUNTING AND/OR ANTI-SOCIAL PARODIES OF SONGS/RHYMES
These two excerpts are given in no particular order
Excerpt #1:
From https://www.bl.uk/playtimes/articles/an-introduction-to-childrens-jokes-and-rude-rhymes
"An introduction to children's jokes and rude rhymes" by Michael Rosen, 26 Oct 2016
"Humour is an important component of children’s play, and nowhere is this more apparent than in their verbal play.

Humour serves a wide range of purposes, allowing children to challenge, undermine and disarm adult power and seriousness, to explore taboo topics as various as sex or toilets, and to experiment with dazzling displays of verbal dexterity. Many funny rhymes are ones which accompany specific games, activities, such as counting out, clapping or skipping. Rude variations of ‘Popeye the Sailor Man’, for example, accompanied clapping games in the mid-20th century. Others are simply performed and passed along for fun. Their humour, their cheek, their rhyme and rhythm, imagery, play on words and frequent parodic trades are all reasons why they appeal to children and why they’re memorable.

An important class of verbal humour is parody. The history of children’s language play abounds in parodic versions of different genres, Christmas carols, pop songs, advertising jingles, Valentine’s Day rhymes, Happy Birthday, football chants, musicals, TV theme songs. The wide variety of genres involved demonstrates a real mixing bowl of popular cultural references, where everything is up for grabs, nothing is sacred and the punch line is all. The sources are equally diverse, other children, adults, comics, books, television, films and the internet."...

****
Excerpt #2
From http://english.ohmynews.com/articleview/article_view.asp?no=381283&rel_no=1
Children Revel in Rude Rhymes: Democracy underpinned by the ability to question and mock authority
by Peter Hinchliffe (Hinchy), Published 2007-12-23
...."Judging by their playground chants and rhymes, children are possessed of a rebellious sense of humor. So it has been down the centuries...

While playing skipping and other games children chant rhymes that break taboos by poking fun at the adult world....

Children who challenge authority with a subversive, and often vulgar, rhyme grow up to be ever wary of authority.

And the ability to question, and sometimes, mock those who would run our lives for us is the firm foundation upon which democracy is built."...

****
EXAMPLES OF "TA RA RA BOOM DE AY" CHILDREN'S RHYMES (CLEAN VERSIONS)
These examples are given in no particular order and are numbered for referencing purposes only.

DISCLAIMER: This is not meant to be a comprehensive compilation of these rhymes.
1.
Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay!
My knickers flew away
They came back yesterday
From a little holiday
-http://english.ohmynews.com/articleview/article_view.asp?no=381283&rel_no=1
Children Revel in Rude Rhymes: Democracy underpinned by the ability to question and mock authority
by Peter Hinchliffe (Hinchy), Published 2007-12-23
-snip-
This example is described as a "skipping rhyme that have echoed round many a playground during recent decades"

****
2.
Ta-ra-ra-boom-de-ay,
There is no school today!
The teacher passed away
Because of tooth decay.
We threw her in the bay;
She scared the sharks away.
-http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=2795
Subject: RE: Heigh Ho, Heigh Ho, I Bit the Teacher's Toe!, Jerry Friedman, 13 Sep 97,
-snip-
This rhyme is describes as "possibly from San Francisco"

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3.
Ta-ra-ra Boom-de-ay! My Knickers Flew Away
Jump Rope Rhyme
Ta ra ra boom de ay
My knickers flew away
I found them yesterday
On the M6 motorway.
-http://www.mamalisa.com/?t=es&p=5199, Paul

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4. Ta ra ra boom de ay
we had no school today
our teacher passed away
we threw her in the bay
she scared the fish away
she won’t come out
she smells like sauerkraut
ta ra ra boom de ay.

I first heard this the same day I heard “Joy To The World The Teacher’s Dead.” They were sung in a medly by a kid who sat behind me in first grade....
- http://playgroundjungle.com/2009/12/ta-ra-ra-boom-de-ay.html "Ta ra ra boom de ay", by thor: Adam Selzer December 7, 2009 (with 74 comments as of July 25, 2017), hereafter given as "playground jungle" article, 2009".

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5. Iona Opie collected this on[e] in the 70s:[United Kingdom]

Ta ra ra boom de ay
my knickers flew away
they had a holiday
they came back yesterday
-"playground jungle" article, 2009

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6. Chicago, early 90's:

Ta ra ra boom de ay
I stole your pants away
and left you standing there
In day-old underwear (or dirty underwear)
Anonymous, August 6, 2011, comment in discussion of "playground jungle" article, 2009

****
7. Tra la la boom dee day my knickers flew away, they went on holiday,
They came back yesterday.

They said they had some fun,
they found another bum.
…..
My father knows the rest but wont tell me.
-Anonymous December 15, 2011, comment in discussion of "playground jungle" article, 2009

****
8. Tra la la boom see ay
they took my pants away
they made me sit there
without my underwear.

St Louis 60s
- Anonymous, May 23, 2012, comment in discussion of "playground jungle" article, 2009

****
9. My grandfather used to sing it Tra La La Boom De A

They took my pants away
They threw me in the air
Without any underwear.
-Jayson Cooper July 4, 2012, comment in discussion of "playground jungle" article, 2009

****
10. I remember this version from the early 1970's Philadelphia area…

Tra la la boom de ay
We have no school today
Our teacher passed away
We shot her yesterday.
As for the principal
he's in the hospital,
As for the secretary
She's in the cemetery.
As for the janitor
He ran off to Canad(er)
Tra la la boom de ay
We have no school today.
- dalas66, March 8, 2013, comment in discussion of "playground jungle" article, 2009

****
11. This one was from my grandma; from the 1950’s in Ontario. She came from Germany after the war….so maybe a creative Anglo version? Kids sang a song with the same tune in Europe in the 1930-40’s she said.

Ta ra ra boom de ay
Did you wash your bum today?
I washed it yesterday,
To keep the flies away
It smelled so bad you see
Nobody would sit by me
Now Ii am so happy
Etc.
-Desan November 29, 2015, comment in discussion of "playground jungle" article, 2009

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12. ...From Virginia in the ’70s”

Tah Rah Rah Boom Dee Yay
Oh what I ate today!
Gave me a tummy ache
That lasted all the day!

And the rest (there WAS a rest, I’m sure) has blown away in the sands of time.
-Jesse M. December 9, 2016, comment in discussion of "playground jungle" article, 2009

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13. Here’s .... as I learned it in Maine circa 1980…

Ta ra ra boom de ay
There is no school today
Our teacher cut a fart
It blew the school apart
-Eric March 2, 2017, comment in discussion of "playground jungle" article, 2009

****
14. We sang this version on coach day trips in the UK in the 1970s.

I only recollect there being 1 verse, before we kids all dissolved into giggles at saying the “naughty” “kn…” word – LOL!

This song was sung by us kids during the long travel journeys that we were stuck on, in a coach on the motorway/road. This was during coach trips organised for the church/church choir, or maybe even the trips run for us Brownies! It was on journeys with either one or both of these childhood hobbies – I can’t remember exactly which group trip it was: I just remember the coach part! If it was the Brownies, then it would have been pretty daring for girls under 11, in those days anyway! ,-)

"Ta ra ra boom de ay
My knickers flew away
I found them yesterday
Along the motorway “
-Southern Belle May 6, 2017, comment in discussion of "playground jungle" article, 2009

****
15. This may be very strange, but I remeber kids on the play ground singing
a version of Ta ra ra Boom de ay. I won't say where, but will hint at when (early to middle 1970's), in elementary school. I can't name the tune, but the lryics went something like this:

Ta Ra Ra BOOM De ay,
the took my clothes away.
Any left me standing there
In Playtex underwear.

I can't help that I grew up on an Army base in the South,
Okay??!!?!!??!? (a small hint)
-Lisa Akers, 4/6/00, https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/alt.tv.dark_shadows/nXirYD45eY0

****
16.
"... I think those are the last two lines to the version I learned in elementary school:

Ta Ra Ra Boom Dee Ay
We are the CIA
While you're standing there
We'll take your underwear.
-Kate, 4/6/00, https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/alt.tv.dark_shadows/nXirYD45eY0

****
17.
TA-RA-RA-BOOM-DE-AY,
I'LL TAKE YOUR PANTS AWAY,
AND WHILE YOU'RE STANDING THERE,
I'LL TAKE YOUR UNDERWEAR.

Submitter comment: SCHOOLBOY "OFFCOLOR" RHYME.
PASSED AROUND DURING GRADES 4-6.
-https://research.udmercy.edu/find/special_collections/digital/cfa/index.php?fl_id=161
The James T. Callow Folklore Archive

****
This concludes Part I of this two part pancocojams series on "Ta Ra Ra Boom De Ay" Children's Rhymes.

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Visitor comments are welcome.

Sunday, July 23, 2017

Rwandan 's Heman Choir- "Haleluya" (video, song summary, & other selected comments)

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcases a 2012 YouTube video of the song "Haleluya" by Rwanda's Heman Choir.

An English language summary of this song is posted from that video's discussion thread along with several other selected comments.

This post is presented for religious, cultural, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Rwanda's Heman Choir.for their musical legacy. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to the publishers of these YouTube videos.

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO: HALELUYA By Heman Choir HD-RWANDA MUSIC VIDEO GOSPEL-Official HD Video



ProMukama Franco Published on Oct 20, 2012

HALELUYA By Heman Choir HD MP4/ A Gospel Video clip produced by Pro Mukama Franco from Freedom Studio, Kigali -Rwanda. Mob: +250 788 451322 My Productions Videos

****
SELECTED COMMENTS:
Here are some comments from this video's discussion thread.

Comments are given in chronological order based on their publishing date, with the oldest comments given first, except for replies. Numbers are assigned for referencing purposes only.

1. Mukama Franco, 2013
"This is my Video Production From Freedom Studio-Kigali Rwanda"

**
2. grandson nt, 2014
"very beautiful song, a phenomenal clip congratulations'

**
3. GospelWitnessMedia, 2014
"Authentic African arrangement and inspiring praise song. Good work Heman Choir!"

**
4. Pauline Foote, 2015
"Fabulous sound ...Keep the dancing "African".. graceful and so rhythmic.. please dont go Bollywood"

**
5. amos sitelu, 2016
"beautiful people beautiful song"

**
6. Jonny Mc'oguta, 2016
"Big up Rwanda singers choir"

**
7. MJ Sakeus, 2016
"I am proud to be an African! keep it up my ppl."

**
8. Eng.Kipchililindet Keter, 2017
"kindly interpret....i like it.blessing my soul"

**
Reply
9. genubi, 2017
"(1) Jesus brought battles to an end as he overcame Satan
(2) Let’s rejoice and glorify Him for he has triumphed
(3) He is the One who overcame all the powers of death
(4) Let’s elevate our voice in praise and rejoice together/
Let’s dance for Him for He is everything
(5) He rose up with glory from the dead on that third day
(6) Thus He is now with the Eternal God -- hallelujah
(7) Let’s entrust Him with our hearts so He may lead them.

God bless!"

**
10. Glenn K., 2017
"What language is this? Regardless the vocals, music, and traditional dress are beautiful!!"

**
Reply
11. carlos nyayo, 2017
"kinyarwanda rwandan language"

****
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Visitor comments are welcome. 

Bahamian Ring Play Examples From "Show Me Your Motion" Documentary Produced by Ian Strachan, Part II

Edited by Azizi Powell

This is Part II of a two part pancocojams series on text (word only) examples of contemporary Bahamian rings plays (children's singing games and children's hand clap rhymes) that are featured in the 2006 documentary "Show Me Your Motion: The Ringplay Games of The Bahamas". The YouTube video of that documentary is also included in these posts.

The ring play examples that are included in this post are divided into two pancocojams posts in order of their appearances in that documentary.

Part II of this series features examples from 57:40 to the last ring play example that is given in that documentary. A few of these examples are from St. Lucia and Trinidad.

Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2017/07/examples-of-show-me-your-motion.html for Part I of this series.

Part I of this series features examples of ring plays from 18:38 to 57:37 of that YouTube video. Prior to 18:38 no examples of ring plays were given.

Part I of this posts also includes my editorial comments about how I happened upon this documentary of Bahamian ring plays" and what I believe is the considerable African American influence on many of these Bahamian ring plays. Although many of these ring plays are of African American origin, it's my position that the Bahamian children and teenagers' creative word and movement adaptations make these ring plays Bahamian.

The content of this post is presented for folkloric, cultural, and recreational purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to the unknown composers of these examples. Thanks also to all those who are featured in this documentary and thanks Ian Strachan, the producer of this documentary and publishers of this video.. Thanks also to all those who were involved in this documentary's production.

WARNING: The showcased documentary video features some scenes of children performing seductive dances and chanting sexualized rhymes that some people may consider to be unsuitable for children.

I added this warning because I'm hoping that this series is used as a supplemental educational resource in the United States, and my experience with United States public educational system informs me that a number of teachers and administrators in that system would have concerns about scenes of children and teenagers performing some of these singing games and rhymes.

****
SHOWCASE VIDEO: Show Me Your Motion: The Ringplay Games of The Bahamas



Ian Strachan, Published on Apr 20, 2017

Show Me Your Motion explores issues of gender, national identity, globalization, class and race in The Bahamas, a prosperous Caribbean nation renowned for its tourism. Producer and Director Ian Strachan addresses these issues through candid, often humorous interviews and live recordings of the ribald children’s songs and dances that are a part of “Ringplay.” ...
-snip-
A trailer to this documentary video was published on YouTube in 2006 by Ward Minnis https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_pZssdkl6GE.

****
PART II
Pancocojams Editor's Note:
The words to these ring plays are either from sub-titles that are found in that documentary or from my transcriptions. Additions and corrections are welcome for my transcriptions.

Time stamps that indicate when those examples appear in that YouTube video are included with these examples. These examples also include my brief performance descriptions about these ring plays.

No written performance descriptions and very little narration about performance descriptions beyond comments about the wining [pronounced to rhyme with the English word "line"] (gyrating hip movements and pelvic thrusts) dance movements were included in this documentary.

My comments after the text (words) for these rhymes largely consists of performance descriptions and comparisons between the specific rhyme and African American/other American rhymes. My apologies as Describing game song/ hand clap performances isn't something I do well. Additions and corrections are welcome.

I've assigned numbers to these examples for references purposes only. These numbers continue from Part I.

These time stamps from that video documentary aren't hyperlinked.

EXAMPLES
22.
57:40 – 57:52ena [no words on screen] – two girls doing hand clap routine

Eenie veena tumbaleena [said fast]
Acca pacca soda pack I love you
????
How do you know
I peeked through the window
Nosy
Wash the dishes
nasty...
-snip-
This is my attempt to transcribe these words as no sub-titles were given. I'm not sure about the spelling and couldn't decipher one line.

This "Eenie Meenie" rhyme is performed in this clip by two girls as a fast paced hand clap rhyme with imitative motions. At least two other girls stand nearby ready to help the girls remember the motions and words for this rhyme. After the words "I love you", the performance activity changes to imitative motions with finger wagging representing a girl being chided because she didn't do the dishes etc. The two girls mess up the clapping routine and the chanting and the rhyme abruptly ends in that documentary clip.

This rhyme, called Eenie Meenie Sisaleenie" and other similar sounding title, is rather well known in the United States as a stand alone hand clap rhyme or as verses that are incorporated into other rhymes. Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/12/eeny-meany-sisaleenie-rhymes-that.html for examples of this rhyme.

****
23. 58:43
woman [Nicolette Bethel, Director of Culture] commenting about the words commenting regarding the words "Achie paloochie":

"Palocha Machie
Conga got no vote

Chances are that the words started out as something that made sense in some African language. But we don’t know what it is and transmitted from person to person we’ve lost
sense of it so we’re only approximating the sound of it"...
-snip-
This is my attempt to transcribe this quote. No information is given regarding the "Congo got no vote" rhyme, but my assumption is that "Congo" here refers to Black people in the Bahamas and not people from the two African nations known as the Congo.

Given that this clip was presented after the "eenie meenie" hand clap rhyme that is given as #22 above] and an "Eenie Meenie" rhyme that is given as #___ below, I assume that Ms. Bethel is suggesting that the nonsense sounding words in those Bahamian ring plays (if not in other Bahamian ring plays) are from some African language. I disagree with that conclusion, but that is discussion for another blog post.

****
24.
58:56-
This is a brief clip of two girls showing how a hand clap routine is done:
"it’s slide push clap
slide push clap"

****
25.
59:03
I met a guy
ah risco
He’s so sweet
Ah risco
Like my cherry tree
Ah risco
I can drink coffee
I can drink ....tea.
I can meet the boy...
-snip-
This is my transcription of this example. One girl is chanting this hand clap rhyme while standing in the middle of a small circle formed by other girls. No hand clapping is performed.

This example appears to be an adaptation of the African American "Nabisco" rhyme combined with the African American rhyme "I Love Coffee, I Love Tea".

In this documentary clip. when the girl in the middle says "I can drink" she forgets the word, and someone else says "Tea". When she says "I can meet the boy", someone else says a line that ends with the word "baby". At the end of this clip, the girl looks somewhat shocked by something indecipherable that someone else said. I wonder if it was the "come on, baby let's go to bed" ending for the African American rhyme "I Love Coffee, I Love Tea".

****
26.
59:22 -59:42
Slide push clap
Slide push clap
[Said faster] Eena meena Josephina
Oh ah tambourrina
Akalaka booshalaka
Baby I love you; yes I do

Saw you with your boyfriend last night
How did you know
I peeked through the window; Nosey.
Go wash dem dishes; Lazy
Gimme some candy: Greedy
Jump through the window; Crazy.
What do you eat?
Pig feet.
What did you drink?
Red ink.
-snip-
These words were given as sub-titles. Two girls are shown doing a fast hand clap routine, but only one girl chants the words.

Read my comments for #23 given above. There is an African American hand clap game called "Slide", but I don't believe that the words "slide, push, clap" are chanted during that hand clap game or during any other American hand clap game that I've found to date.

****
1:00:46 1:01:13 I went to the Chinese bakery- words on screen [girls standing in two lines facing each other [hand clap with some imitative movements- for instance hold both hands to their chest for the word “my”]
I went to the Chinese Bakery
to buy a loaf of bread, bread, bread

I went to the Chinese Bakery
And this is what they said said said
My name is King Kong Corey
I can do karate [imitating the same leaning back karate stance]
Punch em in the belly [acting like they are punching the person standing in front of them- I while maintaining space in between each other]
oops I;m sorry [holding their eyes down with one finger on each eye- imitating crying?]
Chinese, Japanese [keeps hands near their eyes, stretching the eyes?
Criss cross [rhythmically slap right hip with left hand left hip with right hand ]
Applesauce
Do me a favor and get lost [does the rolling, lean back a little, and hold hand out in talk to the hand AA street stances]



The verse that begins "what do you eat?/ pig feet" is a stand alone African American rhyming saying that is associated with the "What's your name/ Puddin Tane" rhyming sayings. Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2014/11/early-examples-of-childrens-rhyme-whats.html for a pancocojams post on those rhyming sayings.

I suppose that it's possible that those sayings could have originated in the Caribbean.

****
27.
1:00:46 1:01:13
I went to the Chinese bakery-
I went to the Chinese Bakery
to buy a loaf of bread, bread, bread

I went to the Chinese Bakery
And this is what they said said said
My name is King Kong Corey
I can do karate
Punch em in the belly
oops I'm sorry
Chinese, Japanese
Criss cross
Applesauce
Do me a favor and get LOST
-snip-
These words are given as sub-titles. The girls stand in two line facing each other, first doing hand claps and then changing to imitative movements:

On the word "my" which is stretched out, the girls hold both hands to their chest.
On the phrase "I can do karate", the girls imitate the same karate stance
On the words "punch 'em in the belly, the girls maintain some distance but act like they are "karate" punching the person standing across from them.
On the words "oops, I'm so sorry", the girls hold their eyes down with one finger on each eye, probably in imitation of the crying
One the words, "Chinese Japanese", the girls keep their hands near their eyes, perhaps stretching their eyes*
On the word "criss cross apple sause", the girls rhythmically slap their right hip with their left hand, and their left hip with their right hand
On the word "do me a favor and get lost", the girls do the body rolling, leaning back a little, and "talk to the hand" African American street stance that means both confrontation and dismissal.

This rhyme is a version of the very well known American rhyme "I Went To The Chinese Restaurant"*. I don't think that the "King Kong Corey" referent is found in American versions of that rhyme.

*Some versions of "I Went To The Chinese Restaurant", such as the this one, have problematic anti-Asian words and actions. Click https://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/07/anti-asian-rhymes-i-went-to-chinese.html for a pancocojams post on this rhyme.

As I noted in my comments after the example given as #11 in Part I, "borrowing" this rhyme without considering the meaning of this line, encapsulates the danger of taking everything from American culture in without a filter for the negativity that is part of that culture.

****
28.
1:01:53-1:01:59
Peas porridge hot
Peas porridge cold
Peas porridge in the pot
Nine days old.
Say what!
Some like it hot
Say what!
Some like it hot.
Some like it cold.
Cold.
Some like it in the pot.
Nine days old.
-snip-
The title "Some Like It Hot" is shown on the screen. Children are heard chanting and performing this rhyme as a hand clap. This is my transcription of the words. No sub-titles and no other visuals are shown.

****
29.
1:03:27-1:03:33
Say boom
Say apple
Say pine
Say wine
Say boom pine apple wine
$1.50 all the time.
[the rhyme begins again from the beginning]
-snip-
The words are given as sub-titles. This clip shows teenagers, women, and men standing forming a circle while one teenagers in the middle of the circle moves around to several person of the circle doing a "leg raised up" dance movement. On the words "say boom pine apple wine" the girl stands in front of the next person forming the circle and does a very seductive wining dance.

I've never come across this rhyme in my study of American children rhymes.

****
30.
1:03:47- 1:03:51
Solee ‘married
Come here lemme tell ya gal
Uh-huh!
-snip-
The words are given as sub-titles. Women and at least one man form a circle and one woman in the middle dances seductively in front of various people forming the ring.

I've never come across this rhyme in my study of American children's rhymes.

Here are quotes from two women who commented throughout this documentary:
"There was a sense of celebrating our female development". [Comment begins around 1:03:36]

"The competitiveness back then was who could be the most sexual and the most alluring. And at the time I didn’t know that was what it was all about, but now when I look back I realize that’s what it was all about”. [This comment begins at around 1:03:53]

****
31.
1:04:06-1:04:48
Jump in the car
turn the keys
Press the gas wit' no panties
She rollin like dat
She bouncin like dat
Say mmmm, like dat
Sauchiss in dere
An rock it too in ‘dere
Take dat belly sauchiss
and stick it right in dere.
You know where
right in dere
Da Devil round de corner
says stick it right in dere
Ticka ticka ticka ticka
boom dynamite
Ticka ticka ticka ticka
boom dynamite
Boom boom boom boom
boom dynamite
-snip-
The words were given as sub-titles. Girls form a large circle with one girl in the middle. That girl doesn't chant along with the others. In the beginning of the rhyme the girl performs imitative motions. On the line "mmm, like that", she moves around the circle on each line of the rhyme and performs a seductive dance in front of the people forming the circle.

This example is a combination of three stand alone rymes: "Jump In The Car", "Sauchiss In Dere", and "Boom Dynamite".

There are examples of rhymes that begin with the line "jump in the car" in the United States, but they are very different from this example. There are lots of examples of American children's cheerleader cheers and other recreational rhymes that include the line "Boom dynamite". But I've not found any examples of "sauchiss in dere". Examples of that rhyme are also given in Part I of this two part pancocojams series.

****
32.
1:16:02- 1:16:27
An examples of "Brown Girl In The Ring" [given without words on the screen or my transcription]

****
33.
1:16:38 = 1:16:53
Example of the circle game "Blue Bird through my window": [given without words or the screen or my transcription]

****
34.
1:18:03 – 1:18:20
I’m ma going to the party
going to the fair.
When I met a Cinderella with flowers in her hair
????
oh si si si si si si like its hot
si si si si si si like a top
Oh rumble to the bottom
rumble on the top
turn around and turn around until you make a stop
-snip-
This is my transcription for this example from the Caribbean nation of St. Lucia. This is played as a circle game with one person in the middle who performs imitative motions and dances.

This circle game is known as "Going TO Kentucky" in the United States and is very well known. The words "Cinderella" probably were "senorita" early on. Through foll processing, "senorita" became "Sister Rita" for some African American children in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area in the early 2000s.

****
35.
1:18-21
Chitty Chitty bang bang
sittin on the wall
tryin to make a dollar
out of fifteen cents
she missed
she missed
she missed like this.
-snip-
These words are given as sub-titles. This is another example from St. Lucia.
In this clip, women form a small circle and play a competitive hand clapping, foot crossing circle game. The same game is played among African American girls and boys (and probably other Americans). In the United States, instead of "sitting on the wall", the line is "sittin on a fence".

****
36.
1:19:08 -1:19:42
An example of "Brown Girl In The Ring" [given with partial words/description, ]:
on the verse: "Go look for your lover
tra la la la la
Go look for your lover
tra la la la la
Go look for your lover
tra la la la la
Oh she looks like a sugar in a plum"

The girl in the middle selects a boy "partner" from those forming the ring and dances with him in the middle of the ring (holding crossed hands.

****
37
1:19:43
Another example of Brown Girl In The Ring [given with partial words and description]
On the words "so hop and take your partner", the girl in the middle chooses a partner, and both of them hop on one foot holding hands".

**
38. .
1:21:28
Little Sally Walker [circle game given without words]

****
39.
1:21:01-1:22-11
Gigalo
Gig Gig alo alo
Gigalo
Gig gig alo alo
You're ready for one
You're ready for two
Put your hands in the air and go
Whoop whoop whoop!
[repeat the entire rhyme]
-snip-
This is my transcription of this rhyme. This example is from Trinidad. Girls form a large circle. Several girls stand in the middle in two lines facing each other. These girls don't chant but do imitative motions. On the words, "Whoop whoop whoop", the girls scooted down close to the ground, and while maintaining their line formation, clap the hands of the person in front of them.

"Gigalo" is rather well known in the United States where it is usually performed as a two, four, or three person hand clap rhyme.

****
39.
1:22:18 –1:22:49
Mama Mama Can’t You See
[repeat each line]
Look what Barney has done to me.
He took away my MTV
Now I have to watch Barney
Tic Tac Toe three in a row
Barney got shot by G.I. Joe
Mama called the doctor and the doctor said
Barney should have stayed in bed
Hip Hip hooray!
Barney;s dead
Hip hip hooray
Barney's dead
-snip-
This is another example from Trinidad. This is my transcription of this example.

Girls form two long lines that face each other and clap the hands of the person standing in front of them. The first time the words "Hip Hi On the words "Hip Hip Hooray", the girls form arches that the other children go under.

I wrote the word "dead" in parenthesis because I'm not certain of this transcription.

A Bahamaian example of this rhyme with slightly different words and played a different way is given in Part I of this series.

"Mama Mama Can't You See" is a very widely known rhyme in the United States. The words to this Trini example are very similar if not the same as words to Americans versions of this rhyme, the performance activity-including repeating each line, is different from the way it is performed in the United States. That said, repeating each line is actually closer to the United States military cadence that was the source of the "Mama Mama Can't You See" hand clap line rhyme.

****
40.
1:23:19 -1:23:47
Oh what can you do Punchinella, Punchinella
What can you do Punchinella 42
Oh we can do it too Punchinella Punchinella
We can do it too
Punchinella 42
-snip-
This is another example from Trinidad. This is my transcription. I'm not sure if the number after the name "Punchinella" is correct.

The a group of girls form a circle with one person in the middle. The girls forming the circle stand in place and clap while they sing this song. On the words "What can you do?", the middle girl (or middle person) does some motion, and the people forming the circle try to do the exact same motion.

This game is very widely known in the United States. After the line "We can do it too", the next line is "Who do you choose". That may also be the next line in this example from Trinidad.

****
This concludes Part II of this two part series on Bahamian (and other Caribbean) ring games.

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Visitor comments are welcome.