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Sunday, August 20, 2017

Early Examples Of "Do Lord Remember Me" & Related Songs

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post presents excerpts from two Mudcat folk music discussion threads and other online sources about early text examples of the song "Do Lord Remember Me" and other religious songs that influenced "So Lord Remember Me".

This post also includes a YouTube sound file of Mississippi John Hurt's rendition of "Do Lord Remember Me".

The content of this post is presented for historical, religious, cultural, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to the composers and collectors of this song. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks to Mississippi John Hurt for his musical legacy. Thanks also to the publisher of this video on YouTube.

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PANCOCOJAMS EDITOR'S NOTES
From reading these excerpts, I gather that the song "Do Lord Remember Me" is dates at least from the early 1860s United States. Certain "African American*" religious songs (referred to as "jubilees") are cited below as early examples of "Do Lord Remember Me" or as songs that influenced versions of that song.

From reading these excerpts, it also appears that [White American] Julia Ward Howe (1819 – 1910), best known for composing "The Battle Hymn Of The Republic", also wrote "Do Lord Remember Me" or, at least, composed a version of that song.

These selected excerpts and quotes are given in no particular order. I've assigned numbers for these excerpts and quotes for referencing purposes only. Multiple selected quotes within an excerpt are also numbered.

*Note the referent "Negro" (also spelled with a lower case "n") is used in some of these quotes. That referent hasn't been used as a referent for African Americans since at least the late 1960s.

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ONLINE EXCERPTS AND QUOTES

EXCERPT #1
From http://www.grace-notes--southern-styling-on-a-digital-piano.com/do-lord-oh-do-remember-me-way-beyond-the-blue-southern-gospel-on-piano/
Do Lord, Oh Do Remember Me (Way Beyond The Blue) Southern Gospel on Piano
Posted on December 16, 2012
" “Do Lord is such a fun song. Many think of it as a kid’s song, but the truth is, you’re never too old to enjoy it. Easy melody, simple lyrics, yes, it’s perfect for children to learn and sing along with. But I never outgrew it. Standing in church, clapping our hands, tapping our toes… having fun. Church should be a happy place...

The message is a good one, and more likely to be remembered for it’s simplicity. It’s also easy to add verses. Over my life, I’ve heard multiple variations, and there’s likely plenty that I haven’t run into yet. Some of the verses I know best are:

(of course) Do Lord, oh Do Lord, Oh Do Remember Me
I’ve got a home in Glory Land that Outshines the Sun
I took Jesus as my savior, you take him Too
Mine eyes have seen the glory of the coming of the Lord
Do Lord Oh Do Lord Lyrics
Do Lord Oh Do Lord Lyrics

Wait, what was that last one? Yes, it’s Battle Hymn of the Republic. That’s actually a legitimate blending, because Battle Hymn and Do Lord are both credited to Julia Ward Howe (1819 – 1910). If she wrote both songs, then she can mix them up any way she wants. There’s a lot of history regarding origin of the Battle Hymn, but not much over Do Lord. And truthfully, her life was a life full of accomplishments, though she’s best remembered in association with Battle Hymn of the Republic, Julia was a speaker, a promoter of women’s rights, an author, and spent her life as an outspoken proponent of several grand causes. In many ways she was far ahead of her time, and not appreciated for it at that time. She even tried to establish an official Mother’s Day, though her attempt at that time was less than successful.

As I record these songs, I’m learning a lot. The songs themselves have deep meaning to me, but for each, some time is spent researching. Learn some history, begin to understand how and when they were written. Unexpected meanings behind the lyrics, social forces that drove the creation. For instance, Battle Hymn was written using an old folk tune, “John Brown’s Body”, for the melody. Before that, it was “Canaan’s Happy Shore”, and “Brothers Will You Meet Me”. She was requested to write new lyrics, to give fighting men a marching song to stir patriotism.

That’s just barely scratching the surface. If you’re interested Julia is worth reading about, and there’s a lot tor read, both by and about her. For me, the main point of interest is the music."

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EXCERPT #2
From http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=32107
1.
"Subject: Lyr Add: BEULAH LAND
From: mousethief
Date: 19 Mar 01 - 06:12 PM

To the same melody,
I've got a sister in gloryland (or Beulah Land, wherever that is)
Outshine the sun
I've got a sister in gloryland
Outshine the sun
I've got a sister in gloryland
Outshine the sun
Away beyond the sky

I've got a brother/mother/father/etc.

Come and go to gloryland
Outshine the sun (etc.)

This from Mississippi John Hurt, who RULES.

Alex

**
2.
Subject: Do Lord Remember Me
From: Dicho
Date: 13 Nov 01 - 03:13 PM

DO LORD REMEMBER ME

Do Lord, do Lord, do remember me (3 times)
O do, Lord, remember me.

When I'm in trouble, do remember me, (3 times)
O do, Lord, remember me.

When I'm dyin, do remembr me (3 times)
O do, Lord, remember me.

When this world's on fire, do remember me (3 times)
O do, Lord, remember me.

1st verse of When My Blood Runs Chiller and Cold identical to 1st verse here.
John W. Work, American Negro Songs and Spirituals, 1940, p. 82.

**
3.
Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Do Lord Remember Me
From: Dicho
Date: 17 Dec 01 - 02:53 PM

DO LORD REMEMBER ME

Cho.
Do Lard, do Lawd, do remember me (3 times)
Do Lawd, remember me.

When I'm sick an' by myself,
Do remember me; (sing couplet 3 times)
Do, Lawd, remember me.

When I'm crossin' Jurdon, etc.

If I ain't got no frien's at all, etc.

Paul and Silus bound in jail, etc.

One did sing while the other one prayed, etc.

When I'm bound in trouble, etc.

When I'm goin' from do' to do', etc.

Grissom, The Negro Sings a New Heaven, 1930 (Dover 1969), p. 68-69 with music.
Some different verses here.

**
4.
Subject: RE: Lyr Add: Do Lord Remember Me
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 18 Nov 10 - 02:01 PM

1863,"Under the Palmetto," H. G. Spaulding, Continental Monthly, Vol. 4, No. 2, p. 198.

O, Lord, Do, Lord (no title)

I'm a like to die as Jesus die,
An' he die with a freely good will,
He lay in de grabe,
An' he stretchy out He arms,
O Lord, remember me.
Chorus:

O, Lord, remember me,
Do, Lord, remember me;
Remember me when de year rolls round,
O, Lord, remember me.

Brief musical score.

http://books.google.com/books?id=uzEZAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA199&dq=%22O+brudder+William%22#22&f=false *

Article found by Jim Dixon.
-snip-
This link is to a Google Books edition of “The Continental Monthly, Volume 4

J.R. Gilmore, 1868 - American periodicals"
-snip-
* That link is no longer viable.

****
EXCERPT #3
From http://mudcat.org/thread.cfm?threadid=40977
Subject: Lyr Add: WHEN MY BLOOD RUNS CHILLER AND COLD
1.
"From: Dicho
Date: 09 Nov 01 - 08:24 PM

WHEN MY BLOOD RUNS CHILLER AND COLD

Cho.
Oh, do, Lord, do, Lord, do remember me,
Do Lord, do, Lord, do remember me,
Oh, do, Lord, do, Lord, do remember me,
Oh, do, Lord, remember me.

When my blood runs chiller and cold, do remember me,
Oh, when my blood runs chiller and cold, do remember me,
Oh, when my blood runs chiller and cold, do remember me,
Oh, do, Lord, remember me.

Cho.
I've got a home in Beulah Land, outshine the sun,
Outshine the sun, outshine the sun,
Oh, I've got a home in Beulah Land, outshine the sun,
'Way beyond the sky.

Cho.
Oh, the shoes that my God give me, outshine the sun, etc.
Cho.
Oh, the robe that my God give me, outshine the sun, etc.

Cho.
If you don't wear no crosses, you can't wear no crown, (3 times)
'Way beyond the sky.

Cho.
Oh, the crown that my God give me outshine the sun,
Outshine the sun, outshine the sun,
Oh, the crown that my God give me outshine the sun,
'Way beyond the sky.
Cho.

Rev. J. R. Gipson and wife, Merryville, LA. John and Ruby Lomax 1939 Southern States Recording Trip. Two songs combined? Only the 1st verse and chorus seem to go with the title.

****
2.
Subject: Lyr Add: WHEN MY BLOOD RUNS CHILLY AND COL'
From: Dicho
Date: 18 Nov 01 - 06:19 PM

When my Blood Runs Chilly and Col'

Oh, when my blood runs chilly an' col',
I'se got to go, I'se got to go, I'se got to go;
Oh, when my blood runs chilly an' col',
I'se got to go, Way beyond de moon.

Cho.
Do, Lord, do, Lord, do remember me,
Oh, do, Lord, do, Lord, do remember me (twice)
Oh, do, Lord, remember me.

Ef you cain't bear no crosses, you cain't wear no crown, 3 times)
Way beyond the moon.

I'se got a mother* in de Beulah land, she's callin' me,
She's callin' me, she's callin' me,
I'se got a mother in de Beulah land, she's callin' me,
Way beyond de sun.

*Repeated for father, brother, sister, etc.

**De harder yo' crosses, de brighter yo' crown, (3 times)
Way beyond de moon.
**Or, Right under your cross, there lies your crown.

Unattributed, in American Ballads and Folk Songs, John A. and Alan Lomax, 1934, p. 610-611.

****
3.
Subject: Lyr Add: JESUS, THOU ART THE SINNER'S FRIEND
From: masato sakurai
Date: 20 Nov 01 - 03:39 AM

"Do, Lord, Remember Me" is also in Grissom, The Negro Sings a New Heaven (1930; Dover, 1969, p. 68; with music)[quoted in Jackson, White and Negro Spirituals, p. 165], and Odum and Johnson, The Negro and His Songs (1925; Negro Universities Press, 1968, p. 92). The version sung by Jimmie Strothers and Joe Lee is in Various Artists, Negro Religious Songs and Services (Rounder CD 1514).
George Pullen Jackson says, "A negro spiritual inspired by this song [Jesus, Thou Art the Sinner's Friend in the Sacred Harp (1844), the Southern Harmony (1835), etc.] is 'Lord, Remember Me'." (Spiritual Folk-Songs of Early America, 1937; Dover, 1964, p. 144). The first stanza with refrain (2x) is:

Jesus, thou art the sinner's friend,
As such I look to thee;
Now in the bowels of thy love,
O Lord, remember me.
O Lord remember me,
O Lord remember me;
Now in the bowels of thy love,
O Lord remember me.
~Masato

****
4.
Subject: Lyr Add: GOIN' TO OUTSHINE DE SUN
From: Dicho
Date: 10 Feb 02 - 09:09 PM

Lyr. Add: GOIN' TO OUTSHINE DE SUN

Well, my mother's goin' to heaven,
She's goin' to outshine the sun, O lord.
Well, my mother's goin' to heaven,
She's goin' to outshine the sun,
Yes, my mother's goin' to heaven to outshine the sun,
An' it's 'way beyon' the moon.

You got a home in the promise lan',
Goin' to outshine the sun, O Lord,
An' it's 'way beyon' the moon.

The crown that my Jesus gave me,
Goin' to outshine the sun, my Lord,
An' it's 'way beyond the moon.

Goin' to put on my crown in glory,
An' outshine the sun, O Lord,
'Way beyond the moon.

H. W. Odum and G. B. Johnson, 1925 (1976) The Negro and His Songs, p. 110, no music."

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EXCERPT #5
From https://www.loc.gov/folklife/LP/NegroReligiousSongsL10_opt.pdf MUSIC DIVISION-RECORDING LABORATORY

FOLK MUSIC OF THE UNITED STATES
"Issued from the Collections of the Archive of American Folk Song
•• A. 1. DO, LORD, REMEMBER ME

A. 1. DO, LORD, REMEMBER ME
[Song and] banjo by Jimmie Strothers and Joe Lee... 1936*

[...]

BLIND Jimmie Sirothers learned his hearty minstrel style of gospel singing while traveling with a medicine [show. Joe Lee sings jubilee songs in truly spiritual fashion. Both have considerable showmanship. In the first selection Joe Lee beats two pieces of wire on the finger-board of the banjo, deftly avoiding the fingers of the player.*

For “Do, Lord, Remember Me" see Spiritual in Old and New by Edward Boatner and Mrs. Willa A. Townsend (Nashville, Tennessee, 1927), No. 54, and American Negro Songs by John W. Work (New York,1940), p. 82.*

[...]

DO,LORD,REMEMBER ME
CHORUS:
[Oh,] Do, Lord, do, Lord, Lord, remember m
Do, Lord, do, Lord, oh; Lord, remember me.

Hallelujuh!

Do, Lord, do, Lord, oh, Lord, remember me.

Oh, do, Lord, remember me.

1. Oh, when I'm in trouble,

Down on my knees,

When I was in trouble,

Lord, remember me.

Oh, when I'm in trouble,

Lord, remember me,

Lord, do, Lord, remember me.

2. Oh, when I am dyin',

Lord, remember me,

Oh, when I am dyin',

Lord, remember me,

Oh, when I am uyin',

Lord, remember me,

Oh, do, Lord, remember me.

Oh, I'm gonna take a little journey,

Lord, remember me.

I'm gonna take little Journey,

Lord, remember me.

Oh, I'm gonna take a little journey,

Lord, remember me,

Oh; do, Lord, remember me."
-snip-
*These portions have multiple misspellings. I rewrote them in this post without those misspellings to enhance their readability.

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SHOWCASE YOUTUBE EXAMPLE: Mississippi John Hurt - Do Lord, Remember Me - field recordings



MyMoppet52, Published on Oct 3, 2014

This is from the 1963 field recordings of Thomas Hoskins when he first met Mississippi John Hurt after tracking him down through a 1920's song. Mrs. Hurt joins her husband in singing "Do Lord, Remember Me". Hurt didn't own a guitar, had not performed in years, had forgotten some of the words, AND had a sore throat that day the stranger showed up. He passed away in 1966, so all (but one recording) the wonderful music we have from him was made in 3 short years. The album, "Discovery: The Rebirth of Mississippi John Hurt" was made from tapes of March 1963, but released in 2011. Enjoy the first meeting of the musicologist and Mississippi John Hurt!

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Saturday, August 19, 2017

"This Little Light Of Mine" & Other Songs & Chants Used In The August 12, 2017 Charlottesville, Va. Counterprotest Rally & Marches

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post documents the performance of the Gospel song "This Little Light Of Mine" and other songs and chants that were sung or chanted to protest the Neo-Nazi, White nationalist march in Charlottesville, Virginia (August 12, 2017).

This post is part of an ongoing pancocojams series on protests songs and chants. Click the "African American protest chants" and the "protest songs and chants" tags for other pancocojams posts in this series.

The content of this post is presented for historical and cultural purposes.

Thanks to all those who have worked and those who are now working for equality and justice for all.

My condolences to the family and friends of Heather Heyer and all others who have lost their lives or have been injured in the Charlotteville, Virginia anti-racism protest marches.
-snip-
Click http://pancocojams.blogspot.com/2013/11/this-little-light-of-mine-information.html for a pancocojams post on the Gospel song "This Little Light Of Mine".
Here's a brief excerpt from that post from http://tincanland.wordpress.com/2011/02/14/let-history-shine-on-this-little-light-of-ours/
" "This Little Light of Mine was written in the 1920s as a song for children by a white northern pastor/music teacher, Harry Dixon Loes. Inspired by one or more of several Gospels which reference the Lord’s shining light, it became a staple of Sunday School teaching across the U.S.

It was in 1952 when The Ward Singers, legendary pioneers of the modern gospel sound, turned it into a ‘gospel’ song for adults. Soon after, Zilphia Horton adapted it further still and taught it to Pete Seeger (as she did with We Shall Overcome) and other folk singers of the 1950s. It became a Civil Rights anthem, generally assumed to be a symbolic old slave song from the south.

Not surprisingly, This Little Light of Mine can be performed in pretty much any manner you please. I’ve found over 30 distinct versions.

Some of the names will be familiar (Brenda Lee, Etta James, Neko Case, Odetta, Roger McGuinn, The Seekers, Sam Cooke, Son House)...

No matter who is singing, This Little Light of Mine remains a most powerful song of personal freedom, and no matter the style, some of the child-like jubilation and wonder found in that original children’s hymn still shines through every time."

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ARTICLE AND BLOG EXCERPTS
These excerpts are given in no particular order and are numbered for referencing purposes only.

Excerpt #1:
From https://forum.astro.com/cgi/forum.cgi?num=1502594398/0 [page 1]
pisceskim
Re: White Supremacists Riot in Virgnia
« Reply #10 - on: 13.08.2017 at 10:46 [UT+1] »
..."I did hear, and the cameras captured, though, for a short time, some of the Ministers and Clergy who came to march peaceably, singing together; a gospel song, the riots and the violence overtook the song. Couldn't tell you what it was they were singing; they were overshadowed and out-rioted I guess"....

**
https://forum.astro.com/cgi/forum.cgi?num=1502594398/60
Mercurian
Re: White Supremacists Riot in Virgnia
« Reply #65 - on: Yesterday at 15:30 [UT+1] »[August 18, 2017]
"The first chart posted is meaningful and interpretations on this thread have been really interesting. For people in Charlottesville, though, the event actually began the night before. There was an important church service at St. Paul's Episcopal Church near the University of Virginia that was intended to inspire everyone to strong and peaceful witness against white supremacy the next day. It began at 7:30pm. It was an interfaith service with many clergy in attendance and the large church was so packed many people were turned away.

While that was happening, the Nazis staged a counter demonstration by marching with torches across the UVA grounds. When they arrived opposite the church in front of the symbolic Rotunda they surrounded a small group of UVA students, who were holding a banner that read, "UVA students against white supremacy." The Nazis threw lighter fluid at the students and hit them with their tiki torches. This was widely misrepresented in the media along the lines of "then the two groups ran into each other and fighting broke out." Katie Couric, who was there, tweeted a better picture of what happened: http://theweek.com/speedreads/718085/white-nationalists-march-chant-nazi-slogan- charlottesville

Meanwhile, in the church at the end of the service, people were told it wasn't safe to go out for a few minutes and then the police allowed them to leave only by the back door.

I'm not a mundane astrologer, so I wouldn't know how to create an event chart for that night, but that's when it all began.

On a more positive note, one reason I think it might be interesting to look at it from the church service is that I feel the events of the weekend have powerful spiritual potential. The clergy at the rally were singing, "this little light of mine," which seems prophetic now after more than 700 candlelit vigils for Charlottesville have been held around the world.* The candlelit vigil at the University of Virginia on the 16th, after Heather Heyer's** stirring memorial service, also conveyed a sense of peace and resilience."
-snip-
*I added italics to highlight this sentence.

**A Nazi-sympathizer drove his car into a crowd of anti-racism counter-demonstrators who were protesting the white supremacist rally, killing Heather Heyer and injuring more than a dozen others. That driver was later arrested and charged with second degree murder.

****
Excerpt #2
From http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/torch-wielding-white-supremacists-march-university-virginia-n792021
August 12, 2017 "Charlottesville White Nationalist Rally Violence Prompts State of Emergency" by Marianna Sotomayor, Phil McCausland, and Ariana Brockingtom
...."Supporters gathered in Emancipation Park Saturday morning in anticipation of a noon rally held by "Unite the Right." The aim of the rally was to protest the removal of a statue honoring Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee. The park was formerly known as Lee Park.

State police and members of the Virginia National Guard surrounded the park after McAuliffe declared a state of emergency and the city of Charlottesville declared the alt-right protest an unlawful assembly — effectively cancelling the demonstration before its planned start time.

Later in the day, a car plowed into a group of counter-protesters, witnesses said. Charlottesville Police Chief Al Thomas said a 32-year-old woman crossing at an intersection was struck and killed, a suspected driver was arrested.

[..]

White nationalists, as well as apparent neo-Nazis and Ku Klux Klan members, were met in opposition by clergy members and other groups, who stood in a line singing "This Little Light of Mine" to drown out the profanity and slurs.*

"Love has already won. We have already won," the counter-protesters responded early Saturday.…

But as the violence intensified with shoving and punching, demonstrators covered their mouths after tear gas was apparently released into the crowd.

Two people were also treated for serious but non-life-threatening injuries near Emancipation Park, the city of Charlottesville tweeted, as tensions flared with back-and-forth shouting and physical posturing.

A large group of counter-protesters wore black shirts and masks and carried shields, yelling to the white nationalists: "We have replaced you. Strong, united, interracial crew."...
-snip-
*I added italics to highlight this sentence.

In addition to Heather Heyer, two Virginia state troopers- H. Jay Cullen and Berke M.M. Bates -were also killed when their helicopter which was monitoring the protest crashed.

****
Excerpt #3
From http://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/charlottesville-white-supremacist-rally-erupts-in-violence-w497446 "After Charlottesville Rally Ends in Violence, Alt-Right Vows to Return"

White supremacists and counterprotestors clashed in Virginia on Saturday, resulting in one death and dozens of injuries
By Sarah Posner, August 13, 2017
"In Charlottesville on Saturday, after the city council and Virginia governor declare a state of emergency and police disband the Unite the Right rally organized by white supremacists, I am following a growing group of demonstrators against the rally, who have begun marching east down Water Street, the southern perimeter of the city's historic downtown mall. Just a few blocks from Emancipation Park, where the white supremacist rally had been scheduled, the marchers appear nonviolent but raucous, chanting, "Whose streets? Our streets!" and holding signs like, "Nazi carpetbaggers go home."
Moments later, the crowd hears a loud, sharp thud. People start screaming and running north, up 3rd and 4th streets to Main Street, a seven-block pedestrian-only stretch of restaurants, shops, and bars.

[...]

On Saturday, Richard Spencer, the president of the white nationalist National Policy Institute, who popularized the term "alt-right" to describe a movement that advocates for a "white ethno-state," depicts the Friday night torch march as an "amazing, spectacular demonstration" (Steve Bannon, Trump's top strategist, has boasted that as head of Breitbart News, he provided "the platform for the Alt-Right.") The Alt-Right has marched with torches before, at a previous demonstration in Charlottesville in May. "I love the torches," Spencer tells Rolling Stone. "It's spectacular; it's theatrical and mystical and magical and religious, even."

[...]

Despite Spencer's claims that his group was attacked by members of Antifa, a loose, anarchist movement of anti-fascist protesters that has clashed with the alt-right in other cities, many of the rally opponents in Charlottesville were religious liberals, Black Lives Matter activists and others who showed up to protest racism and white supremacy. The visible religious presence includes clergy and congregants who march, offer people food and water, and set up space at the First United Methodist Church for people to seek respite. In the parking lot, people link arms and sing, "We Shall Overcome."*...

And while there were certainly Antifa protesters who carried sticks and clubs, others were not armed, and say they were attacked by white supremacists. Renee, who declines to give her last name, has a long, deep vertical gash on her forehead, which she tells me she received by being "clocked" by a wooden shield wielded by a "Nazi;" she describes a shield like the one carried by the Vanguard America group.

John Carico, and Antifa organizer from Chattanooga, Tennessee, who is with Renee, has for four years protested outside the annual meeting of American Renaissance, a white supremacist group that rents a rural Tennessee venue for its conference, says he was also attacked. He says his group was chanting, "no hate, no KKK, no fascist USA." The group that attacked them, he says, was chanting, "Jews will not replace us."

This weekend in Charlottesville appeared to be the largest – and most violent – public gathering the white supremacist alt-right has had thus far. But Trump, who reportedly thrills to chaos and conflict, can't muster the words to condemn racism, white nationalism, or the alt-right. No surprise there – he did the same thing during his campaign, winking and nodding with the Alt-Right through tweets, retweets, dog-whistling, and half-hearted disavowals.

In other words, Trump is the president he signaled he'd be – the one who emboldened the alt-right, and then stood by while they wreaked havoc on America.
-snip-
*I added italics to highlight that sentence.

“Antifa” = antifascists protestors

****
Excerpt #4:
From https://www.vox.com/2017/8/12/16138460/charlottesville-unite-right-rally-violence-protests
"Charlottesville Unite the Right rally: what’s happened so far"
Updated by Libby Nelson and Dara Lind Aug 12, 2017, 3:29pm EDT
"A planned Unite the Right white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, drew nationwide attention as neo-Nazis with torches marched on the University of Virginia campus Friday night and officials called for a state of emergency amid protests Saturday morning.

Many Unite the Right protesters wore white nationalist and Nazi paraphernalia, a militia arrived armed with heavy weaponry and some individuals wore Ku Klux Klan imagery. Former KKK leader David Duke attended.

Counter-protesters were out in force, too, chanting progressive slogans and singing civil rights-era songs.*

Police called the protest an unlawful gathering and attempted to disburse the white nationalists and counter protesters from a central location. Both sides began to march throughout Charlottesville, despite skirmishes and the use of tear gas.

Several counter-protesters were injured when a car rammed into a crowd of them marching through the streets. The car fled the scene.

The rally was ostensibly a protest against removing a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee from a Charlottesville park. From its original base of right-wing “patriot” groups, the rally started drawing a growing number of neo-Nazis — and become a flashpoint for a resurgent, outspoken white nationalism that drew strength from the campaign and presidency of Donald Trump.

[...]

Friday night, the night before the planned rally was scheduled to begin, a group of about 100 white nationalists marched on the University of Virginia carrying tiki torches and chanting Nazi slogans. Police dispersed the crowd, and one protester was arrested.

Saturday morning, the scheduled rally began at Emancipation Park, where white nationalists; counter-protesters, including church groups; and unofficial “militias” carrying weapons and dressed in camouflage assembled. Fights broke out between rallygoers and counter-protesters

[...]

Police declared the gathering an unlawful assembly. Not long after the rally began, Charlottesville declared a local emergency, and Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe declared a statewide state of emergency. McAuliffe already had the state National Guard on standby, according to ABC News.

As the rally dispersed, white nationalist groups went on the march through Charlottesville, chanting anti-Semitic, anti-immigration, and racist slogans — including “one people, one nation, end immigration, according to the Washington Post’s Joe Heim. They targeted spectators specifically for abuse"...
-snip-
*I added italics to highlight these sentences.

****
Excerpt #5
WARNING: This post includes profanity in documenting White nationalist signage.

From https://www.indy100.com/article/charlottesville-virginia-far-right-protests-clergy-religious-singing-white-supremacists-7890176
Anti-racism protesters sing 'This Little Light of Mine' in front of armed white supremacists
Posted August 12, 2017 by Narjas Zatat in videos
..."Huffington Post reporter Christopher Mathias captured the moment counter-protesters held hands and sang ‘This Little Light of Mine’ to white supremacists marching by

Joe Heim ✔ @JoeHeim
Faith groups at Emancipation park singing "this little light of mine." White supremacists chanting 'blood and soil'.
9:31 AM - Aug 12, 2017

[embedded video]

The remarkable moment left a mark on people:

I'm Peachy. @rebmy75
Replying to @letsgomathias
I am so thankful for their strong presence. Hide it under a bushel ? No ! I'm gonna let it shine !! Amen !!
9:57 AM - Aug 12, 2017

[embedded video]

Many of the counter-protesters were clergymen and clergywomen:

12 Aug
Joe Heim ✔ @JoeHeim
Faith groups at Emancipation park singing "this little light of mine." White supremacists chanting 'blood and soil'. pic.twitter.com/EEs7HTKFwr
Follow
Sue Bingham @suebingham4
Love these clergy! All Respect.
10:18 AM - Aug 12, 2017"
-snip-
These two video clips are of mostly White protestors singing “This little light of mine”

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SHOWCASE VIDEO: How the Violence Unfolded in Charlottesville | The New York Times



The New York Times, Published on Aug 15, 2017

White nationalists and counterprotesters blamed each other and the police for the violence that erupted in Charlottesville, Va., on Saturday. Amateur video verified by The New York Times paints a picture of how the events led to one death and multiple injuries.
-snip-
The line of counterprotestors singing "This Little Light Of Mine" is occurs around .43 in this video

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Friday, August 18, 2017

Comments From A YouTube Discussion Thread About The Use Of The Racial Referents "Morena" & "Negra" In Spain & In Some Other Spanish Speaking Nations

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post features Part I of a YouTube video entitled "Black In Spain" and focuses on selected comments from that video's discussion thread about which is the meanings of the Spanish referents "morena"/"moreno" and "negro"/negra" and which is the most appropriate referent/non-racist term to use for people of Black descent.

The content of this post is presented for socio-cultural and linguistic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to the publisher of this video and thanks to all those who are quoted in this post.

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SHOWCASE VIDEO:
Black In Spain | Part 1



Somewhere Always Published on May 5, 2016

I'm talking about being Black again- SHOCKER! Some say Spain is racist. I say... well you've got to watch to find out! I was in Spain for over a year. Being Black abroad can be stressful, worrisome and overwhelming at times. *sigh*
-snip-
Click https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SSFA8yWcrh8 for Part II of this vlog.

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SELECTED COMMENTS FROM THIS VIDEO'S DISCUSSION THREAD
Pancocojams Editor's Note:
These comments are given in chronological order with the oldest comments by year presented first, except for replies. Numbers are assigned to these comments for referencing purposes only.

1. Ramón Antonio Parada, 2016
"I'm Spanish (Galician) and I had an African American girlfriend from California. People from Spain would think that American perspective on race is way too complicated if they knew about it, but they don't know about it. I think you reflected this well in the video. I have used the words "American American" because my ex-girlfriend explained that it was the right word to use. She had to explain to me many things about American culture.

I think the reason that we use both negra and morena is because of we don't know what the right word is. There is not right word because 20 years ago there were only black people in a couple of cities in Spain. Most people use a word based on the level of brown of the skin, plain and simple. We also use the same words if a local white person gets a lot of tan. Some other people may have a more complex view like assume that all latin americans are morenas (being mulata a synonym) and americans & african will be negras but much less people than the first ones. But nobody will understand your complex view on this topic.

We are like naive for the good and for the bad. I want to think that most of the time we do well. Sometimes we want to be friendly and say something that would be inappropriate in the states, like if someone asks you "why your hair is that way?". In that case is just curiosity, that person didn't saw a hair like yours in their life. They don't remotely know about what you are thinking about. 99% of the people in Spain won't understand the hair part of this video.

Sadly we sometimes can be racist or too stereotypical and don't event notice. Some people will assume that black people are always the same: poor, foreigner and from african origin and will only be proven wrong if you clearly dress like a money person. That in part is because of our history, we lived in a dictatorship not long ago and we had little communication with other countries so most black people came to Spain less than ten years ago, were poor and started with small jobs or selling in the street. Hopefully this people are starting to have Spanish born children and starting to do well but still rich black people are mostly football players.

When I was a child in the small town were I was born Baltasar Magic King was always played by a white guy with the skin painted so 5 year olds would think it is the real Baltasar King and they would love it without realizing he is painted. Nobody with black skin or long white beard lived there so we did the best we could. And I think the same happened in the big cities like Madrid because I don't remember seein something different on TV. It was only after I was 20 that started seeing Baltasar played by a black guy in big cities. Children now have seen black people so now even 5 year olds can tell a fake Baltasar. Also there is now black people in my little town but Baltasar is still a painted white guy. Why is that? Magic Kings are played by volunteers, it wouldn't be polite to ask somebody to play certain role because of their beard or skin, and we are used to our fake Magic Kings but we have to paint them better.

I hope this helps. For any person who reads this if you are thinking about visiting Spain don't waste your precious time worrying about finding a racist person. Ignore him if you find one, you are better than him, and I hope you have a great time in Spain!"

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2. sa m, 2016
"About the negro/moreno issue... The word negro/a is just an adjective, and there's nothing wrong with that. When people try to avoid describing you as negro/a is really a red flag cause they think its a bad word when is not.

I've encountered situations when I've said that I'm a black person and they responded me by saying "no, you're just morena", and that's what's really offensive and racist."

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Reply
3. Sharrif Bey, 2017
"sa m - they are calling you by the name of your ancient ancestors whether they know it or not. Deeply melanin rich people that ruled the world and navigated the 7 seas, the Moors, hence, Moreno y Morena is Kool."

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4. Luna Ariyadi, 2016
"Idk why are people so pissed off! In Spanish "Negro" is just the name of a color. In America everytime you refer to someone you don't know you probably would say "that tall guy over there" or "the blond one". A white person is called "Blanco" and a black person is called "Negro". If Americans took the word "negro" to use it the wrong way it's not Spain's fault. My boyfriend is black and when we point someone to know who are we talking about if that person is black he would say "el negro" like any other person would. It would be racist if you said something wrong about it or add an insult like "puto negro" that's racist. But the word black alone just means black. Also "moreno" can be anybody with darker skin than pale."

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Reply
5. Somewhere Always, 2016
"+Luna Ariyadi this is pissed to you? I was extra calm. Also- I'm actually not the color Black, I'm brown. If calling me Negro is acknowledging my race - then Spaniards should acknowledge race in society not just in conversation."

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Reply
6. Sharrif Bey, 2017
"Luna Ariyadi - Moreno means Moor; lineage of all melanin rich people. Spain during the inquisition took over Al Andalusia which it was called before the defeat of the Moors at Granada."

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Reply
Luna Ariyadi, 2017
"Moreno doesn't mean moor, MORO means moor and is an offensive word. Moreno means "darker than white" I'm morena, if you see me outside you would call me morena, but I'm not African or from the North of Africa. Indonesian people are morenos, South American people are morenos. In history class we have always learned people who conquered the South of Spain were called "moros" not "morenos" because a lot of people from different ethnicities can be called moreno."

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Reply
8. Luna Ariyadi, 2017
"I'm not complaining about you, I'm generalizing people who don't fully know the meaning of some words and might have cultural shocks because of it. A person with African origins here are called "Africanos", "negros" or "personas de color". In the US you call an Afroamerican "black" right? here is the same thing. A white person is called white and a black person is called black, it is not racist, it is not meant to be an offensive word, it is in English but not in Spanish. Here even black people call "negro" to other black people, everybody does. Just like someone would call me "morena" and someone would call a white person "blanco". And if you don't like it tell people how would you like to be called instead and comprehensive people will understand."

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Reply
9. Sharrif Bey, 2017
"Black, and white being used to classify people for supremacy purposes came from Alfred Blumenbach, and Karolus Lineaus; its called a caste system, get it. You're right peoples all over the world that are deeply melanin enriched are also Moors, hence Moreno. Black being a nation of people doesn't exist, nor white. What people have been taught to use is connotative linguistics, instead of denotative. Its about knowing, not feelings."

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10. Amelia D, 2016
"I've been living in Spain for a month and before I came I saw so many videos about the racism here. I have experienced none of it fortunately. So many people said it would be racist but it actually wasn't. I hadn't even been called Morena. In Barcelona I had a convo about the racism in America and how police brutality was never new in the US. I guess I lived with a good host family. I just heard someone say el negro. That's all. knocks on wood"

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Reply
11. Amelia, 2016
"Also I don't think being called negro is racist. When I first started learning Spanish we learned that black (race) is negro. That's just what it is. It's a harsher word than Morena which is just like a "shade" but in Spanish id proudly say that I'm "negra" that's what it is. I feel like Asian ppl were highlighted more than blacks anyway. Like many would just refer to Asians as chinos. Which again means Chinese, but my friend who is Chinese, was always referred to as la China and never by her name. No one really bothered to find out her name. That I think was racist"

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Reply
12. NeccoWecco1, 2016
"You're called morena because you aren't as dark toned as many people who come from africa. It is racism, since you are being singled out for your skin tone, but it isnt necessarily mean they were treating it negatively. I'm a white foreigner in Spain and I have been treated both rudely (being called guiri) and others who treat me as everyone else in the community. I think, just as you stated, people often use words like negra, morena, guiri in a context that they think is non-offensive, but fail to realise that it is inherently offensive."

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13. NeccoWecco, 2016
"+moonbeeps Guiri is despective. It's saying "filthy foreigner", pointing out that you are different, dont fit in, and don't belong. Obviously, Guiri de mierda, is way worse."

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Reply
14. moonbeeps, 2016
"No it isnt, its just a way to refer to a very white person that looks german or english. If you say sguiri de mierda then ofcourse its despective..... Or negra de mierda. Ofcourse that despective. But just guiri or just negro is a way to refer to someone's phisical apearance. I know, im spanish. And its certainly doesnt mean filthy foreigner xDDD"

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15. Hiponakte, 2016
Where I live "morena" is (at least originally) the dark skinned Mediterranean type (moreno=moorish like), whereas "negra" is the subsaharan really black skinned type. Now, "morena" usually have a sexy ring, something like "my pretty dark skinned girl", and I think that black people prefer the word "moreno/a" than "negro/a" . The word "negra" is kind of neutral in Spain (but not always), and the word "negrita" (literally "little black girl"), used as "pretty black girl", may easily sound condescending. So I use "moreno/a" instead of "negro/a": language is always evolving, black people like it, and it sounds well and amicable.

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16. Hiponakte, 2016
"+SomewhereAlways Tee The problem is that the pair "black/white" was never really Spanish until the English American culture became the culture of the West (in the good and bad things). In Spanish "blanco" is (was?) someone who couldn't get any tan: those who pass from milky-white to crab-red in the sun. And "blanco" was not seen as a race. Now, with the trend of calling "moreno" to black people (something that in Latin America is much more established than in Spain) the meaning of "blanco" is also shifting: it can't be that my younger sister, who is very "blanca" (she can't get any tan, no matter how much she tries), and me, who can get quite a tan, can't be from different "races", and even less from different "ethnicities". Language is evolving, we will see where all this thing ends."

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Reply
17. SomewhereAlways, 2016
"+Hiponakte which is precisely why I say it's relative. I take everyone as they are with their vocabulary but if I see a trend that Spaniards who are damn near the same color as me (and I've met QUITE a few) are considered morena but you call me negra. It makes me wonder. Especially when I've never heard any Spaniard use negra in a positive tone. In other situations (mainly in America) speaking Spanish- I don't blink an eye. But let's not forget that the concept of race (caucasoid, negroid etc) originated in Europe. slavery perpetuated it in Europe AND America. Its just developed into a different idea in America than in Europe."

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Reply
18. Hiponakte, 2016
"+SomewhereAlways Tee A dark Spanish woman (or a dark Moroccan woman etc.) is "morena", but not "negra", because traditionally "morena" was "dark Mediterranean", and nobody would mistake you with a native Andalusian, or Moroccan, Sicilian, Tunisian etc. Anyway, I'd like to point out this: the black people that we have in Spain (from Senegal, Mali, Nigeria...) have not experienced the association of race and slavery that the black people in the Americas have suffered, nor the post slavery history of legal segregation or de facto segregation... they have another story and history: they are migrants and unskilled workers in a country where is not easy to find a job. So they have had difficult experiences and traumas... but different from that of the African Americans.

Another interesting difference between the USA and Spain is that in Spain the ethnicities that have been traditionally more discriminated against are not the blacks, but the "gitanos" (gypsies) and "moros" (North African or Middle Eastern Muslims). The Gypsies and the Muslims have been wronged, the Gypsies and Muslims have "persecution paranoia" and integration problems, but the blacks are regarded as peaceful and hardworking (the situation in France is just the same, but with a much older black community)."

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19. Felicity Martinez, 2016
"I am mixed and Spanish and the word for me is "mulata", but sometimes as an insult i have been called "negra + [insert bad thing]". It depends on the connotation, but normally people refer to my mother (100% black african) as morena and me and my brother are "morenitos/mulatos". In Andalucia, where I'm from, people usually use "africano" for just black people because the majority of the black population are in fact African inmigrants. I hope this helps to clear it ;)"

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Reply
20. Felicity Martinez, 2016
"Also, in Andalucia they call white people (as in White americans, germans, english, etc) "guiris", which they dont' consider themselves or any mediterranean people to be in the same category."

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Reply
21. Hiponakte, 2016
"+Felicity Martinez Interesting comment. And I can tell you that the word "guiri", used for foreigners, is originally Basque (I am from the Basque Country): in the Southern Basque Country (Spain) "christian" is said "kristau", whereas in the Northern Basque Country (France) "christian" is said "giristino" (the "g" in Basque is always pronounced soft, "gu"). So the Southern Basques began to refer to the Northern Basques with the derogatory contraction "guiri"(-stino). Nowadays the word is used with the meaning of "noisy and gaudy European (or White American) tourist"... and I would say that the word "guiri" is still derogatory, in the same league as "moro", "ni&&a"*, "spick" etc."
-snip-
*This word is fully spelled out in this comment.

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Reply
22. Surf Florida, 2016
" "Guiri" is a term used in the whole country and not only in Andalucia. however it is is not synonym for white. Guiri is used to describe a foreigner, usually from northern European countries, who comes to Spain on holidays. A "guiri is a way to describe Europeans vacationing in Spain. If you move there to work or study you do not qualify as a "guiri" anymore :)"

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Reply
23. Northern Light, 2017
"Well its like that in Finland too. If someone is talking about "tumma tyttö" = dark girl it can mean that the girl has dark hair or that she has darker skin than average Finnish person. There are no official racial terms. So for me if someone called me "white boy" (like they seem to do in US), I would be ready to fight. I find describing me like that very offensive. I also know that if Finnish black person would call me "valkoinen poika" = white boy that he/she would try to offend me."

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24. Carmen Ferreras Santana, 2016
"I´m Dominican, my family is very diversy... In my home, we all have different skin tones, I have light skin and straight hair sisters and a brother, and black with afro hair sisters and brother... I´m also a black with afro hair... My parents call me "negra", my best friend and she has white skin and she calls me "morena", "negra" and I don´t mind because I know she´s not saying it in a bad way, some guys when they are flirting with me they call me "Negra" and obviesly is not racism... I think this words ain´t an issue until we become it into one. Is not the same to call a person "negra/o" that say "Ese/a negro/a" ... I mean the word by itself is hurtless.... You have to listen the all sentences or evaluate the all context of a conversation to judge the word as a racist instrument. Good bless you all, and remember that we are the same under our skins."

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25. Rocio, 2016
"It will always depends on how (tone) people say the word "NEGRA" for any hispanics and Spanish people you will be selected as a "Negra" but we don't mean it in a bad way but like a category. You are right people define Jennifer Lopez as a "MORENA" because she has dark skin but not very that dark black. Most of the people (specially hispanics) when they are talking to a black person will always say that you are "MORENA" because it sounds and it feels better to say in order to not feel uncomfortable.
I hope you understood sorry if you didn't get it lol I tried my best english hahaha

greetings!"

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26. Atheris Nebulosa, 2016
"I'm Spanish and we call black people negros/as and black people call themselves like that as well not only here but also in Latinoamérica. I do the same and even if they call you "negrita" is kind of cute, I don't think it is negative as well as calling white a white girl is not. Simply because there is nothing wrong in being black or white, it's just beautiful that human beings come in different shades and shapes. By the way in from Granada and I appreciate that you enjoyed Andalucía 👍 👋"

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Reply
27. Somewhere Always, 2016
"+Atheris Nebulosa I loooooooooooooved Granada- except the cold hahaha. Por eso me queda en Malaga!

Negro only bothers me because spain doesn't really acknowledge race. But then they'll call me negra instead of morena and say it's because of my race...🤔"

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28. Alberto Cano, 2016
"Gracias Guapa! Btw: there is an expression "estar negro" (being black) that only means being "mad" or very upset. It has no racist connotation. In Spanish there are 2 verbs "to be" and this is a bit confusing sometimes. Hasta pronto."

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Reply
29. Somewhere Always, 2016
"+Alberto Cano Yeah I doubt any racist intent is meant. It's a modern colloquialism. But more often than not linguistically black is bad and negative and white is pure and good. That's not a coincidence."

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30. Sara Rifat, 2016
"As well, depending on what part of Spain you go to they will call you Negra, Morena etc. I mean, in the South it's much more different that at the north and stuff like that."

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Reply
31. Rafa Cañizares, 2016
"Actually not. I was born in the South of Spain but currently I live in the North, so I can tell you there is not distinction between different parts of the country. All of the spaniards use words like "negra, mulata, morena, etc" by the context or referring a concrete race."

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32. DuskSunDawn, 2016
"Well, spanish people don't refer to themselves as "white" (blancos").
They refer to themselves as latins (latinos) or europeans ("europeos"). The social identity of spainish people is 1º) being from in Spain 2º) belonging to a latin country and having the latin culture 3º) belonging to catholic culture (if you don't include "catholic culture" inside the concept of "latin culture").

However, they are used to describe people using worrds like "árabes" (arabs), gitanos (spanish gipsies), gitano del este (easthern gipsies), "negros" (blacks).

Please notice that sometimes "negro"(black) is seen as a sign of racism. Some people prefer to call them "africanos"( african people")."

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33. DuskSunDawn, 2016
"About "morena". "Morena" is usually means "someone who has black hair".
However, "morena" also means "someone who has tanned skin".
They describe physical appearance, not race.
For example, some spanish people say "En América Latina las personas tienen una piel mas morena""("In Latin America people have darker skin tone")."

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34. Guido Duh, 2017
"Negro/negra are not really that offensive in the Spanish language in general but they might have some racist connotation sometimes and in some places more than others. Where I live we use negro and moreno almost indistinctly even for people with non obvious African ancestry as "el negro Araiza" (a T. V. presenter) or "el son de la negra" (a folk song). And we tend to add ito/ita diminutive endings that mimic Nahuatl honorific/diminutive ending tzin to make them sound even less racist (at least for our Mexican ears)."

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35. Ignacio de Puig, 2017
"well I'm from Spain and the word that people use the most to insult or offend black people is `negrata´. if u ever hear this word turn around call ¨la guardia civil and beat that guys but before they arrive."

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36. Rosario Navío, 2017
"Negra can both be good and racist"

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37. Ana León Martin, 2017
"it is more racist to say morena instead of negra, because that means being negra its not possitive. A lot of the black-spanish community is trying to show that negro or negra do not need eufemisims. Lots of love from Spain honey❤"

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38. Bill Asbell, 2017
"Morena means brunette in Spanish, Negra means black, pure and simple."

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39. NyFilmmaker32, 2017
"Bill Asbell Moreno is used to describe brunettes and brown skinned people in Spanish. Negro isn't used as much, and depending on the context can be perjorative"

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40. cilveti, 2017
"Late to the party but I just wanted to clarify that, as you have shown in your example, if someone uses negro as an adjective on you (ese chico negro) there is no problem, but if they use the word negro to DEFINE you (ese negro) then they are being racist, since they treat you as someone different than them just for being black"

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Five Videos Of Malian (West Africa) Performer Thialé Arby

Edited by Azizi Powell

This pancocojams post showcase five videos of Malian singer .

In addition to the singing and music, these videos are also presented to showcase the traditional clothing and hairstyles of the performers and their audiences.

The content of this post is presented for cultural, entertainment, and aesthetic purposes.

All copyrights remain with their owners.

Thanks to Thialé Arby for his musical legacy. Thanks to all those who are quoted in this post and thanks also to Syllart26, the publisher of these videos on YouTube.

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SHOWCASE VIDEOS
These videos are presented in chronological order with the video with the oldest publishing date given first.

Example #1: Thialé Arby Top Etoile 2014 (Musique Malienne)


Syllart26 LIVE Mali Published on Jan 26, 2016

By Syllart26 LIVE Mali Musique

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Example #2: Thialé Harby Aye Bine Bakoye Top Etoile 2015 Mama Toumani Kone (Musique Malienne)



Syllart26 LIVE Mali, Published on Jan 26, 2016

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Example #3: Thialé ARBY - Dibalo LIVE Madina Coura BKO 2016



Syllart26 LIVE Mali, Published on Nov 20, 2016

By Syllart26 LIVE Mali Musique

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Example #4: Thialé Arby - Dibolo LIVE Special Police Malienne 2017



Syllart26 LIVE Mali, Published on Apr 23, 2017

By Syllart26 LIVE Mali Musique

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Example #5: Thialé Arby - Diarabi LIVE Segou Mali 2017



Syllart26 LIVE Mali Published on May 8, 2017

by Syllart26 Live

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